Curriculum Contest

Contest Exam Descriptions

ART

Figure Drawing I (for Freshmen and Sophomores only)

Charcoal or pencil drawing from a model. Paper not smaller than 18×24. Students must supply paper, charcoal or pencil drawing media, erasers, and a drawing board. Drawings will be evaluated by realistic rendering of the human figure, attention to proportion and rendering of the figure within the compositional space of the paper. Only one student per school may enter this contest.

Figure Drawing II (for Juniors and Seniors only)

Charcoal or pencil drawing from a model. Paper not smaller than 18×24. Students must supply paper, charcoal or pencil drawing media, erasers, and a drawing board. Drawings will be evaluated by realistic rendering of the human figure, attention to proportion and rendering of the figure within the compositional space of the paper. Only one student per school may enter this contest.

BUSINESS

Accounting I

The exam is designed to measure a student’s understanding of basic accounting. The exam consists of multiple-choice and problem-type questions over fundamental accounting knowledge such as terminology, principles and procedures, journal entries, accounts, and the balance sheets. No calculators are allowed.

Personal Finance

The exam is designed to evaluate a student’s personal financial literacy as discussed in high school personal finance classes. It contains multiple-choice and problem-type questions over topics such as the time value of money, loans and borrowing, credit and credit management, banking and financial services, saving and investing, insurance, tax, and personal financial decisions. No calculators are allowed.

General Business

The General Business exam is designed to assess the contestant’s general knowledge of today’s business world. The exam consists of multiple-choice and true-false questions over business vocabulary and fundamental concepts, and includes questions over the business environment, organization, human resources, law and finance.

MS Excel

The exam is a comprehensive theory exam covering Microsoft Excel from Office 2016. Computers are not used; the test is true-false and multiple-choice questions.

COMMUNICATION

Speech

The exam is designed to measure a student’s understanding of competent communication skills. It includes a variety human communication contexts: interpersonal, group, and public. The exam consists of multiple-choice questions over fundamental communication knowledge such as how to organize informative and persuasive speeches, delivery styles, types of arguments, parliamentary procedures, effective listening skills, types of nonverbal communication, and relationship development.

Journalism

Students will play the role of journalist. They will have a set of facts presented to them about which they will write a news or feature story. Students will be judged on: 1) lead and paragraph order, 2) grammar, 3) AP Style and, 4) general content. Only one student per school is allowed to enter this contest.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

Computer Concepts

The exam covers the concepts of general computer programming and logic algorithms based on computer concepts. Topics covered include making decisions, looping, control breaks, basic truth tables, array manipulation, structured programming techniques and interpretation of pseudo code segments. This exam is non-language specific and is hardware independent. Computers are not used. The test consists of true-false and multiple-choice questions.

Integrated Productivity Software

This exam covers the application of integrated productivity software such as Microsoft Office. Topics include: templates, macros, custom user environments, master documents, data validation, pivot tables, integration of data between applications, using VBA with Excel, elementary SQL, advanced reporting techniques, and other features not normally covered in an introductory Office course. Computers are not used. The test consists of true-false and multiple-choice questions.

ENGLISH

English I (Freshman)

Reading List: Epic: Homer, The Odyssey; Drama: William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet; Novel: Charles Dickens, Great Expectations; Poetry: Robert Frost, “Birches,” William Wordsworth, “I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud,” William Shakespeare, “The Seven Ages of Man,” Langston Hughes, “Harlem,” “Mother to Son,” Emily Dickinson, “A Narrow Fellow in the Grass,” “I’m Nobody,” Theodore Roethke, “The Bat”; Short Stories: Doris Lessing, “Through the Tunnel,” Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, “A Mother in Mannville,” Richard Connell, “The Most Dangerous Game,” James Hurst, “The Scarlet Ibis,” Borden Deal, “Antaeus,” Edgar Allen Poe, “The Cask of Amontillado”

English II (Sophomore)

Reading List: Drama: Willam Shakespeare, Julius Caesar; Novella: John Steinbeck, The Pearl; Short Fiction: Willa Cather, “Neighbor Rosicky,” Toni Cade Bambera, “Blues Ain’t No Mockin Bird,” Kate Chopin, “A Pair of Silk Stockings,” Sarah Orne Jewett, “A White Heron,” Kurt Vonnegut, “Harrison Bergeron,” Edgar Allen Poe, “The Masque of the Red Death,” Guy de Maupassant, “A Piece of Yarn,” Gabriel García Marquez, “The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World,” Juanita Platero & Siyowin Miller, “Chee’s
Daughter”; Nonfiction: Annie Dillared, “In the Jungle,”; Poetry: Sylvia Plath, “Mirror,” Alice Walker, “Women,” Langston Hughes, “Dreams,” Countee Cullen, “Sonnet,” Elizabeth Bishop, “One Art,” John Keats, “La Belle Dame sans Merci,” e.e. cummings, “i thank you You God for most this amazing,” Emily Dickinson, “She Sweeps with Many-Colored Brooms”

English III (Junior)

American Literature. The test will emphasize recognition of literary forms and themes, close reading of specific texts, and a comprehension of American Literature. The following authors and individual works will be covered: Poetry: Walt Whitman – “Song of Myself,” Emily Dickinson – “Tell All the Truth by Tell It Slant,” W.C. Williams – “The Red Wheel Barrow,” and Joy Harjo – “The Flood.” Drama: Tennessee Williams – “The Glass Menagerie,” Novel: Nathaniel Hawthorne – “The Scarlet Letter,” Short Story: Henry James – “Daisy Miller,” Edgar Allen Poe – “House of Usher,” Flannery O’Conner – “A Good Man is Hard to Find,” William Faulkner – “A Rose for Emily,” and Alice Walker – “Everyday Use,” Essay: Ralph Waldo Emerson – “Nature,” Annie Dillard – “Pilgrim at Tinker Creek,” and Richard Rodriquez – “The Hunger of Memory.”

English IV (Senior)

The exam will draw questions from some but not all of the following: Chaucer, Prologue to Canterbury Tales. The Gawain-Poet, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Shakespeare, Macbeth. Sonnets, #1, 3, 30, 55, 60, 65, 94, 116, 130, 138. John Donne, “Valediction: Forbidding Mourning” & Holy Sonnet 10. Johnathan Swift, “A Voyage to Lilliput” from Gulliver’s Travels. William Blake, from Songs of Innocence, “The Lamb” & “The Chimney Sweeper.” From Songs of Experience, “The Tyger” & “The Chimney Sweeper.” William Wordsworth, “Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey.” Percy Bysshe Shelley, “To a Sky-Lark” & “Hymn to Intellectual Beauty.” John Keats, “Ode to a Nightingale” & “Ode on a Grecian Urn,” Samual Taylor Coleridge, “The Eolian Harp” and ” Kubla Khan.” Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Sonnets from the Portuguese, #21, 22, 43. Alfred Tennyson, “Ulysses” & “The Lady of Shalott.” Matthew Arnold, “Dover Beach” (for tiebreaker essay). Christina Rossetti, Goblin Market. James Joyce, from Dubliners, “Araby.”

MATHEMATICS

Algebra I

The exam may include questions concerning: fundamental properties of the real number system, factoring and products of algebraic expressions, lines, solutions of linear systems, equations involving one variable, fractions, inequalities and absolute values. Calculators are not permitted. Pencils are required.

Algebra II

The exam may include questions concerning: linear equations, quadratic equations, exponents and radicals, graphs, factoring, relations, functions, inequalities, matrices, arithmetic, geometric progressions modeling, and data analysis. Calculators are not permitted. Pencils are required.

Mathematics Challenge

This exam includes questions which require an understanding of algebra, geometry and mathematical reasoning. This exam is a fun exercise in basic mathematics for those who enjoy the subject. The problems range from easy to difficult, most of them being multiple-choice. There will be several short answer problems as well. The exam is directed toward Juniors and Seniors, but others are welcome. Calculators are not permitted. Pencils are required.

Plane Geometry

The exam may include questions concerning: logical reasoning, polygons, circles, proportions, congruence, similarity, parallelism, betweenness, perpendicularity, proofs, loci, trigonometric ratios, geometric solids, coordinate geometry, areas and volumes. Calculators are not permitted. Pencils are required.

Trigonometry

The exam may include questions concerning: trigonometric functions, trigonometric relations of right triangles, graphs of trigonometric functions, solving trigonometric equations, verifying trigonometric identities, vectors, polar coodinates and complex numbers. Calculators are not permitted. Pencils are required.

MODERN LANGUAGES

French I

An objective test on the principles of grammar, reading comprehension, vocabulary, and culture.

French II

An objective test on the principles of grammar, reading comprehension, vocabulary, and culture. Emphasis on tenses: passé composé imparfait, and future.

Spanish I

An objective test on the principles of grammar, reading comprehension, and vocabulary. No native speakers may enter.

Spanish II

An objective test on the principles of grammar, reading comprehension, and vocabulary. No native speakers may enter.

MUSIC

Music Fundamentals

Category I – Identification of key signatures, scales, intervals, triads, as well as concepts of time, rhythm, and meter. Category II – Definitions of basic musical terms, tempo markings, and character indications.

Music Literature

An assessment of the comprehensive knowledge of a first-year music major, including various styles of music of the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries.

OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY & HEALTH

General Safety

A general knowledge exam over the various areas of safety. Contestants should be familiar with workplace, home, transportation (highway), fire, and personal safety.

PSYCHOLOGY

Psychology

The test is designed to measure a student’s understanding of psychological principles. It consists of multiple-choice and true-false questions over vocabulary and fundamental concepts. Topics include personality theories, substance abuse, psychological disorders, human development, and personal adjustment.

SCIENCES

Anatomy & Physiology

The exam is based on material covered in most anatomy and physiology texts. It stresses biochemical and metabolic processes at the cellular, histological and systemic levels, as well as the structure of the human body at the cellular, histological and gross levels.

Biology

The exam is based on material covered in most general biology texts. It stresses the chemistry of life, genetics, evolution, ecology, classification of life and human physiology.

Chemistry

Questions will emphasize the observed properties and descriptions of elements and compounds, periodic properties of the elements, chemical and physical properties of matter, basic principles of chemical reactions including quantitative aspects, chemical compound formulas, atomic structure, chemical terminology, and metric conversions frequently used in chemistry. Some questions may involve the interpretation of graphs, tables, observations or other data. Calculators are recommended.

Conservation

The exam is based on material covered in most conservation and general ecology texts. Additional sources of pertinent information include the television program “Outdoor Oklahoma”, the periodical Outdoor Oklahoma, hunting and fishing regulations for Oklahoma, and other literature distributed by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. The exam stresses conservation and management of plants and animals in Oklahoma; however, global conservation topics will be included.

Earth & Space Science

The exam is based on concepts in physical geology, astronomy and meteorology. Emphasis is on the descriptive aspects of these subjects.

Electronics

The test may cover the nature of electricity, basic electrical quantities, Ohm’s law and it’s application, DC circuit analysis, magnetism, basic AC concepts, logic fundamentals, and simple electronic circuits. Calculators are recommended.

Physical Science

Questions cover skills such as observation, measurement, interpretation of data, problem solving, inferences, hypothesis, laws, and theories. Topics include motion, force, work, energy, properties of matter, elements and the periodic table, reactions, compounds, radioactivity, astronomy, and earth science. Calculators are recommended.

Physics

Problems deal with the application of principles in mechanics, heat, sound, magnetism, light, electricity and modern physics. Principles include generalizing statements that summarize observed phenomena and theories or explanations proposed to account for the observation. Calculators may be used.

SOCIAL SCIENCE

Government & Politics

The test is confined to American government. It covers the basic structure, nature and operation of both the federal system and the three branches of the National government. The structure and operation of the American party system is included.

Economics

The exam is designed to measure a student’s understanding of economic principles. Not all high-school students will have taken a formal course in economics, but all will have learned something about it in their regular courses or through the informational media. However, a course in economics would improve the score. The exam includes questions about the economic functions and relations of households, businesses, and governments in a market economy. The test is open to all high-school students.

Geography

The test examines the understanding of the basic concepts of geography as the spatial structure of human behavior. Specific questions over physical geography are also included.

Oklahoma History

The test is not confined to one text. Facts concerning how Oklahoma became a part of the United States, the coming of the Five Civilized Tribes of Indians, the economic and social development of the Indians, the cattlemen, the Boomers and the Sooners, and the twin territories should be known. Some attention is given to the geography of the state.

United States History

The test is over facts in all the epics of our history. It includes chronology, biography, issues, treaties, development of government, expansions of territory, economic and social progress, and foreign relations. Some attention is given to current events.

World History

Contestants should be familiar with outstanding movements in world history, including the relative chronology. They should be able to identify important persons, places, and events in historical context.