Southeastern News

Musical Arts Series begins September 14 with mezzo-soprano Catherine Martin

DURANT, Okla. – The Musical Arts Series on the campus of Southeastern Oklahoma State University opens its 44th season with Catherine Martin, mezzo-soprano on Thursday, September 14, at 7:30 p.m.  in the Fine Arts Recital Hall.

Admission is free for all performances of the Musical Arts Series. The 2017-2018 Musical Arts Series is sponsored in part by Southeastern Oklahoma State University, Red River Arts Council, Oklahoma Arts Council, Native American Institute, and National Endowment for the Arts.

 

Martin will perform Richard Wagner’s Wesendonck Lieder, selections of Cabaret Songs by Benjamin Britten, and more.  In addition to Martin’s evening concert, she will offer a public masterclass with voice students from the Department of Music at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, September 13, in the Fine Arts Recital Hall.

American mezzo-soprano Catherine Martin has been praised by The Washington Post for her “gorgeous, warm voice that you want to keep listening to,” and she continues to make an impact in repertoire ranging from Verdi and Wagner to Strauss and Bellini.

For more information about this event and or information about  becoming become a sponsor of the Music Arts Series, contact Dr. Jeremy Blackwood, MAS Coordinator, at 580-745-2096.

High school counselors learn more about Southeastern during visit

Southeastern president Sean Burrage welcomes high school counselors to campus Tuesday.

Southeastern president Sean Burrage welcomes high school counselors to campus Tuesday.

DURANT, Okla. – High school counselors from throughout southern Oklahoma and north Texas went back to school Tuesday morning in Durant.

The counselors attended a breakfast and information session hosted by the Office of Admissions and Recruitment at Southeastern Oklahoma State University. The purpose of the event, attended by 34 educators, was to provide an overview of admission services and academic programs offered to prospective students by the University.

“We were very pleased with the interest and participation from the counselors today,’’ said Christy Rogers, director of admissions and recruitment. “While we are providing information, at the same time, the feedback we receive is very helpful in understanding what students want to know about college. We hope

to plan similar events throughout the year.’’

Southeastern representatives offered presentations on financial aid, the Honors Program, scholarships, and various academic programs, including occupational safety & health, business, and sciences.

Southeastern ranks seventh nationally in graduating Native American students

DURANT, Okla. – Southeastern Oklahoma State University continues to rank among the nation’s leaders in producing Native American graduates.

According to the latest rankings by Diverse Issues In Higher Education, Southeastern is seventh in the nation for graduating Native American students (baccalaureate) in all disciplines combined.

The University is number one in the Occupational Safety & Health field, and  number two in three other areas – Chemistry; Health, Physical  Education,  and Recreation;  and Communication.

Southeastern also ranks in the top 10 nationally in a number of other disciplines, including Marketing, Liberal and Applied Studies, Accounting, Psychology, Education,  all business-related programs,  and Computer Science and Computer Information Systems.

On the graduate level, Southeastern is top-ranked in Occupational Safety & Health, second in Health, Physical Education,  & Recreation, and 20th in all disciplines combined.

Approximately 30% of Southeastern’s current enrollment is comprised of Native American students.

Listed below are Southeastern’s programs that correspond to the top 10 rankings on the latest Diverse Issues in Higher Education list:

Baccalaureate

1 – Occupational Safety & Health
2 — Chemistry
2 – Health & Physical Education, Recreation
2 — Communication
3 — Marketing
3 — Liberal and Applied Studies
4 — Accounting
4 — Psychology
4 — Education
9 – Business programs – Accounting, Finance, Management, Marketing, General Business
9 — Computer Science and Computer Information Systems

Graduate (Master’s)

1 – Occupational Safety & Health
2 – Sports Studies and Athletic Administration

 

Source: Diverse: Issues In Higher Education analysis of U.S. Department of Education reportssubmitted by institutions.

 

Murray State, Southeastern professors collaborate to teach English/history class

Dr. Rebecca Jacobs-Pollez, left, of Murray State College, and Dr. Meg Cotter-Lynch work together in the classroom.

Dr. Rebecca Jacobs-Pollez, left, of Murray State College, and Dr. Meg Cotter-Lynch work together in the classroom.

DURANT, Okla. – In March of this year, Murray State College and Southeastern Oklahoma State University announced they would share the services of Chief Financial Officer Dennis Westman.

This unique cost-saving collaboration allowed Southeastern to fill the duties of its Vice President for Business Affairs position, which had been vacant since last fall.  Westman, who had been a full-time Murray employee, now oversees business affairs at both institutions.

Now, on the academic side, the two schools are at it again.

“President (Joy) McDaniel (of Murray) and I agree that with the budget situation like it is in higher education right now, we have to think outside the box,’’ said Southeastern President Sean Burrage,  “not only in terms of economics, but in terms of what we can do to benefit our students. Murray is a tremendous partner to work with, and we look forward to additional collaborative efforts in the future.’’

Beneficiaries of the latest innovative collaboration are Southeastern honors students who take an upper-level transdisciplinary course comprised of World Literature in Translation/Cultural History of theWest in fall of their sophomore year.

The 3893 English course is taught by Dr. Meg Cotter-Lynch, Professor of English and Director of Southeastern’s Honors Program, while the 4973 history component, previously taught by Southeastern facultyuntil budget reductions intervened, is being taught by Dr. Rebecca Jacobs-Pollez, Assistant Professor of History at Murray State College.

“Murray State College and Southeastern Oklahoma State University have developed a partnership that benefits students on both campuses,” MSC President Joy McDaniel said.

“By joining together at the classroom level, we can directly assist students in a way that might not have been possible without the decision to use our resources in this particular way,” McDaniel said.

The courses meet independently on Mondays and Wednesdays, and then on Fridays, the two classes combine for a two-hour discussion on ways in which literature, history, religions, and philosophy interact to shape cultural ideas of individuals and how they interact with the community.

“I appreciate the opportunity to teach this class. The students are enthusiastic and fun, and I am also learning a great deal,which I can use at Murray and hopefully sometime again at Southeastern,” Jacobs-Pollez said.

The collaboration benefits students on many levels, according to Cotter-Lynch.  “As far as the course in general, it helps students see the connections between disciplines and also to understand the value of studying a problem through multiple disciplinary lenses, which is how the real world actually works,” she said. “We all need to understand the history and culture of places we are in to better understand how and why people believe and behave as they do; we need critical thinking and communication skills in order to interact with others.”

Cotter-Lynch added that the utilization of the two professors allows students to gain different perspectives on the same subject, while offering the expertise ofJacobs-Pollez in the field of Medieval History.

The two institutions plan on additional collaborative projects to combine faculty and administration for the benefit of students.

Impressive crowd celebrates Homecoming at Southeastern

Southeastern president Sean Burrage, left, presents the Heritage Award to Dr. Don Sullivan, who accepted the award on behalf of his late father Coach Bloomer Sullivan and the family.

Southeastern president Sean Burrage, left, presents the Heritage Award to Dr. Don Sullivan, who accepted the award on behalf of his late father Coach Bloomer Sullivan and the family.

DURANT, Okla. – An impressive number of alumni and friends returned to campus over the weekend as Southeastern Oklahoma State University celebrated Homecoming 2016.

The Distinguished Awards Banquet recognizing Distinguished Alumni, Distinguished Former Faculty and the Heritage honoree was held Friday in the Visual and Performing Arts Center.

Honored this year as  Distinguished Alumni were William Fahrendorf, Executive Vice President and Chief Administration Officer of Durant’s First United Bank; Lee Lipscomb, retired attorney, Engstrom, Lipscomb & Lack; and Bill Groom, TV and film designer.

This year’s Distinguished Former Faculty Award recipients were Dr. Gordon Eggleton, Betty  Wintle, and the late Dr. James Wintle

The Heritage Award was presented posthumously to Hall of Fame coach BloomerSullivan, with his son  Dr. Don Sulllivan accepting the honor.

Among the special guests attending Friday’s event were Chancellor and former Southeastern president Glen D. Johnson and his wife Melinda.

On Saturday morning, the traditional Homecoming Parade was held in downtownDurant, followed by the Alumni Tailgate Party across from Paul Laird Field.

Crowned Homecoming Queen and King at Saturday’s football game were Kayla Castagnetta, a senior  biology/psychology from Hartshorne, Oklahoma, and

Kirk Sanders, a senior occupational safety and health major from Telephone, Texas.

On the playing field, the Southeastern Savage Storm defeated Southern Nazarene45-14, to run their record to 3-1.

Southeastern president Sean Burrage, far right, joins the honorees Friday night at the Distinguished Awards Banquet. Left to right are William Fahrendorf, Dr. Gordon Eggleton, Betty Wintle, and Lee Lipscomb. Distinguished Alumni recipient Bill Groom could not attend the ceremony due to professional obligations.

Southeastern president Sean Burrage, far right, joins the honorees Friday night at the Distinguished Awards Banquet. Left to right are William Fahrendorf, Dr. Gordon Eggleton, Betty Wintle, and Lee Lipscomb. Distinguished Alumni recipient Bill Groom could not attend the ceremony due to professional obligations.

Southeastern president Sean Burrage congratulates Homecoming Queen and King Kayla Castagnetta and Kirk Sanders.

Southeastern president Sean Burrage congratulates Homecoming Queen and King Kayla Castagnetta and Kirk Sanders.

Three Southeastern graduates among “50 Women Making a Difference In Oklahoma’’

DURANT, Okla. – Three graduates of Southeastern Oklahoma State University are among the “50 Women Making A Difference In Oklahoma’’ as selected by The Journal Record.

The honorees from Southeastern are attorney Heather Burrage (’99), Burrage Law Firm, Durant; Michele Campbell (‘88,’90), Oklahoma Small Business Development Center, Durant; and Dr. Amanda Cobb-Greetham (’92), Coca Cola professor and director of the Native American Studies Program in the University of Oklahoma College of Arts and Sciences.

Heather Burrage

Heather Burrage

Michele Campbell

Michele Campbell

Amanda Cobb-Greetham

Amanda Cobb-Greetham

 

 

 

 

 

The 50 honorees will be honored at the 2016 Journal Record Woman of the Year gala set for Nov. 2 at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. Judge Jane P. Wiseman will be the keynote speaker. Wiseman, who was the first woman to serve on both the trial and appellate divisions of the Oklahoma Court on the Judiciary, has served as a judge with the Oklahoma Court of Civil Appeals in Tulsa since 2005.

Also that evening, the “Woman of the Year’’ will be announced.

The 2016 event marks the 36th year for the Woman of the Yearprogram, designed to inspire confidence among women to go out and make their mark.

Southeastern promotes wellness through “Commit To Get Fit’’ challenge

Teaming up to participate in the Commit To Get Fit challenge are Southeastern staff members/students Rachel Toews,  Taylor Barrick , Stefan Kells, and Sara Alvarez.

Teaming up to participate in the Commit To Get Fit challenge are Southeastern staff members/students Rachel Toews, Taylor Barrick , Stefan Kells, and Sara Alvarez.

DURANT, Okla. Students, faculty and staff are taking a proactive approach to wellness  at Southeastern Oklahoma State University.

Collectively, since the implementation of a voluntary  “Commit to Get Fit’’ challenge  in 2015, 655 participants have lost more than 2,000 pounds.

The basic concept of “Commit to Get Fit’’ is for participants to exercise 30 minutes a day for five days a week, with a goal of walking 40,000 steps every week. Healthy eating habits are also encouraged.

The team competition includes incentives and prizes as motivation.

“The Commit to Get Fit challenge addresses several issues that I feel are important – promoting a healthy lifestyle for faculty, staff and students and encouraging teambuilding and leadership,’’ said Southeastern president Sean Burrage, who is an active participant  in the program.  “We all have busy daily routines and I think it is important that we promote physical fitness on our campus. And this is a fun program in which everyone can participate and encourage one another.’’

The Commit to Get Fit Challenge was also designed to promote Healthy Campus2020 objectives for the Certified Healthy Oklahoma Program. Certified Healthy participants are recognized for promoting health and wellness where Oklahomans live, work and play. This program recently designated Southeastern at the excellent level as a campus.

The Certified Healthy Oklahoma Program began in 2003 as a collaborative initiative with four founding partners – the Oklahoma Turning Point Council, the Oklahoma Academy for State Goals, the Oklahoma State Chamber and the Oklahoma State Department of Health.

Southeastern’s Educational Opportunity Center grant renewed

DURANT, Okla. – The U.S. Department of Education recently announced that Southeastern Oklahoma StateUniversity has received a $500,720 (2016-17) grant to continue the Educational Opportunity Centers (EOC) program.

Educational Opportunity Centers are one of eight grant programs collectively known as the Federal TRIO Programs. These programs identify and provide services for individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds. They assist low-income individuals, first-generation college students, veterans, military-connected students, and individuals with disabilities to  progress through the academic pipeline from middle school to post-baccalaureate programs.

The Southeastern EOC serves 1,620 individuals annually.

The TRIO programs hosted at Southeastern are Upward Bound, Upward Bound Math/Science, Texoma Upward Bound, Educational Talent Search, Student Support Services, Educational Opportunity Centers, and Project: TEACH.  Combined, the TRIO programs at Southeastern serve 3,149 students annually, and have successfully met their mandatory objectives each year since the first program (Upward Bound) began in 1966.

Teriki Barnes serves as director of the Educational Opportunity Center at Southeastern.

In all, the Department of Education awarded $48 million in grants to 143

colleges and organizations in 42 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.

The grants provide readily accessible college guidance to adults who may not otherwise quickly decipher the steps needed for college admissions and continued success through graduation.

EOC grants, five years in duration, assist adults in gaining the skills necessary for pursuing postsecondary credentials.

Participants are connected to tutors, mentors and counselors for guidance on admission, financial aid and postsecondary course selection. For those who may not have finished high school, help is offered on secondary school re-entry or high school equivalency exam programs – or other alternative education programs.

EOC projects also provide services to students traditionally underrepresented in postsecondary education, including students with disabilities, limited English proficiency, and other disadvantaged groups, such as those who may be homeless, exiting foster care or otherwise disconnected.

Fall semester begins at Southeastern, freshman numbers up

Southeastern president Sean Burrage speaks at Freshman Convocation. 

Southeastern president Sean Burrage speaks at Freshman Convocation.

DURANT, Okla. – An overflow crowd gathered in Montgomery Auditorium Saturday afternoon as Southeastern Oklahoma State University held Freshman Convocation.

The event officially welcomes new freshmen and their parents to the Southeastern campus. This fall, first-time freshman enrollment at Southeastern is currently up approximately 10% over last fall.

University president Sean Burrage was among those offering remarks, with  Southeastern faculty, staff and students also attending the annual event.

Following the 30-minute program, a cookout was held on the front lawn of campus.

Earlier in the summer, new students attended Camp SE, an orientation program.

Fall classes began on Monday, with the Office of Student Life offering a Storm Week of campus activities for students.

Faculty Symposium concludes with safety training at Southeastern

pdDURANT, Okla. – Brandon Mitchell of the Durant Police Department conducts Civilian Response to Active Shooter Events (CRASE) training Wednesday morning at Southeastern Oklahoma State University’s Faculty Symposium. The two day symposium was held in the Fine Arts Recital Hall. Fall classes begin on Monday, Aug. 15.