Southeastern News

Students, professor present at National Indian Education conference

Baleigh Hudman and Michael Noah made presentations at the National Indian Education Association Conference.

Baleigh Hudman and Michael Noah made presentations at the National Indian Education Association Conference.

DURANT, Okla. – Southeastern Oklahoma State University students Michael Noah and Baleigh Hudman joined Dr. Shannon McCraw, associate professor of communication, in presenting a workshop at the 44th annual National Indian Education Association Conference.

The conference was held Oct. 30-Nov. 2 at the Rushmore Plaza Civic Center in Rapid City, South Dakota.

The workshop was entitled “Preparing Highly Competent Native American Communicators: The Cooperative Argumentation Project.” It explored ways of introducing the study of argument through narratives or telling stories.

McCraw said, “It is exciting to work with students as talented as Michael and Baleigh. Both of these students exhibit the best qualities of highly engaged students at Southeastern.”

Noah is a sophomore communication major from Battiest, and Hudman is a freshman from Howe, Texas, who is undecided on a major.

“Learning how to build arguments is an important life skill,” said Hudman. “Too many people view argument as negative, though. Stories can lead to productive dialogue. This can lead to better understanding and better decision-making.”

Noah said, “It was truly gratifying to hear other Native Americans across Indian Country, especially elders, tell us we did a wonderful job on our speeches. I was proud of what we accomplished.”

Both students are members of The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, active with the Native American Student Association, and members of the President’s Leadership Class.

Presenting to 70 people from across the United States, Noah and Hudman introduced the audience to narrative structure and explained how to build a story as a form of argument.

“Michael did an exceptional job introducing the audience to the idea of argument as a story,” McCraw said.

McCraw partners with the Native American Center for Student Success on a public speaking initiative designed to build critical thinking and presentation skills.

Students from the program will present speeches at 3 p.m. Nov. 21 in the Glen D. Johnson Student Union auditorium as part of Native November activities at Southeastern.

Southeastern Chorale to present concert Nov. 19

DURANT, Okla. – The Southeastern Chorale, under the direction of Dr. Stacy Weger, will be featured in concert on Tuesday, Nov. 19, at 7:30 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall.

The concert, titled “Lost Child,” investigates music regarding society’s responsibility to children, giving voice to children at risk.  This concert is performed in conjunction with a series of lectures and other arts events focused on the same topic.  This multidisciplinary approach, a first for choral concerts on campus, is designed to give insight and perspective which will enrich the listening experience.

Music selections for the concert are quite diverse, spanning a wide range of styles from Renaissance to Contemporary.  The concert will feature a setting of Kofi Annan’s speech to the United Nations regarding the world’s obligation to its children “The 21st Century” by Greg Bartholomew.

The concert continues with selections on children during a time of war, violence against children, and alienation.

Tristan Eggener will serve as accompanist for this concert.  Logan Russell, Sarah Carr, Brenna Dougherty, and Brian Campos will perform solos. Admission is free and open to the public, however the Southeastern Chorale is asking that patrons bring non-perishable items to the concert for the food drive currently underway.

For more information please contact the Department of Music at 580-745-2088.

“Veteran’’ student perseveres to pursue college degree

Tracey Claxton, John Williams, Mary Meeks, and Southeastern president Larry Minks attend a scholarship  presentation.

Tracey Claxton, John Williams, Mary Meeks, and Southeastern president Larry Minks attend a scholarship presentation.

DURANT, Okla. – John A Williams Jr. (his middle name is A — it is not an initial) and his wife Tina were working at low-income jobs in Durant, trying to juggle schedules and take care of their three children.

“It was a miserable time for us,” Williams said. “We were trying to make enough money to just get by and it wasn’t working out. We had lost one of our cars to repossession.

“I was in the employment office in Durant talking to the Veterans Representative when I first heard about Veterans Upward Bound. I couldn’t afford a baby sitter so I borrowed gas money and took my 3-year-old with me to East Central in Ada to visit the VUB office.

“Mary Meeks (EC VUB program director) and Jill Williamson (academic counselor) offered amazing help to get me into college. I had some low grades on some of the tests and it was pretty discouraging. They stuck with me and everything worked out.

“Tracey Claxton (Tutor Coordinator/Academic Counselor in Southeastern’s Student Support Services program) helped financially through the TRIO program. These people have made a huge difference in my life.”

Williams will be 44 years old November 25 and had not been in school since 1989 except for a brief stint when he became certified for law enforcement at Rockingham (N.C.) Community College.

He had always wanted to go to college, but things had not worked out for him. He joined the U.S. Navy after graduating from Alliance (Ohio) High School in 1989.

His plan to make the Navy a career was sidetracked when a military cutback saw him honorably discharged in 1993. He worked with hydraulics in the Navy, specifically the arresting cable (tailhook) that stopped planes landing on aircraft carriers.

A tailhook accident cost him part of his left index finger. The run of bad luck continued when he was leaving his ship one day and a speeding truck driver hit him. That left him with 30 percent disability.

After the unplanned end to his Navy career, Williams bounced around the country. He lived in six states and held numerous jobs from fast food to manufacturing to truck driving to handyman to landscaping to taking newspapers off the press.

He came to Oklahoma looking for work in 1997, left in 2004 and returned in 2007.

He met Tina, his second wife, when both worked in Durant. She is from Michigan, he from Ohio. Naturally, they met in Durant, Oklahoma.

“When I realized I could actually go to college,” Williams said, “it was pretty scary. I hadn’t been to school in a long time and would be with kids just out of high school. I finally decided my experiences might even give me a little edge on them. I’ve been job hunting with no degree and I know exactly how difficult it is.”

Vocational Rehab offered the opportunity to change his life and Williams is taking full advantage of it. The $1,000 National Veterans Upward Bound (VUB) scholarship made things a bit easier. He is now in his second semester at Southeastern. His first-semester delivered an impressive grade-point average.

He will be 48, maybe 49 years old when he gets his degree in fisheries and wildlife. He also wants to pursue an advanced degree in marine biology or oceanography with an eye on conducting environmental research.

“I worry about getting my degree at that age,” John said, “but I’m hoping someone will hire me. Everything is looking up. I’m getting my degree and I’m really driven and motivated by this opportunity.

“Several people went out of their way to help me get into college and started on this path. Now it’s up to me to hold up my end of the deal.”

True Blue Chili Cook-off set for Nov. 16

TailgatingDURANT, Okla. – Don’t miss the True Blue Chili Cook-off and Southeastern Tailgate Party when the Savage Storm play host to East Central in the final football game of the season. The chili cook-off has been added to spice things up a bit and determine the top lip-blistering chef in the Southeastern and Durant communities.

The Southeastern-East Central game kicks off at 2 p.m. Saturday, November 16, and the Tailgate Party begins at 11 a.m. with all chili cookers on-site in Tailgate Alley.

Chili must be ready for the judges by  noon. Judging begins at 12:30 p.m. and free chili will be available for everyone in attendance.

The judges’ decision will be announced at 12:45 p.m.

How do you beat a deal like that?

Chili cookers and eaters, along with other tailgaters, will enjoy listening to live music by the Classic Rock Band, Strongwood, and then take part in “The Walk” to the stadium at 1:45 p.m. with kickoff set for 2 p.m.

The True Blue Chili Cook-off is sponsored by the Southeastern Alumni Association and the Durant Area Chamber of Commerce.

Early registration deadline is Thursday, November 14, but you may register on-site the day of the cook-off. To register or for more information, contact the Durant Area Chamber of Commerce at 580-924-0848 or alumni@se.edu.

Campus radio station holds benefit for community

Southeastern senior Don Brown donates a jacket to the U92 Cares effort.

Southeastern senior Don Brown donates a jacket to the U92 Cares effort.

DURANT, Okla. – Southeastern Oklahoma State University’s campus radio station is working with local businesses and charities this fall for the benefit of the community.

“As Southeastern is no stranger to volunteering in the community,” said Dell McLain, chair of the Department of Art, Communication and Theatre,  “the University’s radio station (KSSU 91.9 FM) wants to further connect with the community to help those less fortunate for the holiday season.”

U92, as the station is known, brings its first “U92 Cares” benefit drive to Bryan County by partnering with area businesses Hot Shots Coffee, Main Street Barbecue and Mattresses Plus More.  Benefiting from the effort will be the Crisis Control Center, the Hope Chest and Victory Life Food Bank.

“This great cause began on October 29 and concludes on December 9, the evening of Southeastern’s annual Candlelighting Concert,” said McLain.

Items being accepted are all types of clothing for every age, non-perishable canned and boxed food items, cleaning supplies and toiletries. Items can be dropped off at each of the business locations that are partnered with KSSU and on campus at the U92 Radio Station (located in the Fine Arts Building), as well as at the Glen D. Johnson Student Union.

The station began this new community project as part of its new reboot with a new tower and control center.

“The three service organizations combined serve more than 850 families every month,” said Southeastern junior Steven Dixon. “They know that Texoma is full of people with big hearts and warm spirits; we hope that folks will go out and help our community by helping our neighbors in need.”

Southeastern honors Top 10 Freshmen

Gathering after the awards ceremony were, front row left to right, Madison Elliott, Madison Barr, Kelcey Yanez, Sarah Hodson, and Taylor Scalf. Back row, Southeastern president  Larry Minks, Sarrysa Eaves, Morgan Hartwell, Maddison Williams, Aaron McAdams, and Southeastern Associate Dean for Academic Services Tim Boatmun.  Not pictured, Michael Noah.

Gathering after the awards ceremony were, front row left to right, Madison Elliott, Madison Barr, Kelcey Yanez, Sarah Hodson, and Taylor Scalf. Back row, Southeastern president Larry Minks, Sarrysa Eaves, Morgan Hartwell, Maddison Williams, Aaron McAdams, and Southeastern Associate Dean for Academic Services Tim Boatmun. Not pictured, Michael Noah.

DURANT, Okla. – Southeastern Oklahoma State University’s Office of Freshman Programs hosted the Top 10 Freshman Awards Ceremony Friday in the Glen D. Johnson Student Union.

The honorees were selected by a committee of representatives from faculty, student government and University administration. The honorees have a collective grade-point average of 3.8 and are involved in numerous activities and leadership roles across campus.

The goal of the Top 10 Freshman Award is to recognize, celebrate and nurture the success of first-year students.

The 2012-13 Top 10 Freshman honorees are listed below by hometown (Oklahoma unless otherwise noted) and field of study:

Madison Barr, Owasso, English Education; Sarrysa Eaves, Durant, Chemistry/Biology; Madison Elliott, Durant, Psychology; Morgan Hartwell, Bonham, Texas, Aviation-Professional Pilot; Sarah Hodson, Durant, Elementary Education; Aaron McAdams, Boswell, Mathematics; Michael Noah, Battiest, Communication; Taylor Scalf, Marlow, Early Childhood Education; Maddison Williams, Calera, Political Science/Sociology; and Kelcey Yanez, Wilson, Medical Sciences.

Southeastern student named Chickasaw Princess

DURANT, Okla. – Savannah Nicole Burwell of Ada, a sophomore business major at Southeastern Oklahoma State University, was selected Chickasaw Princess at the tribe's 2013 annual meeting in September. Burwell is pictured with her parents, Jason and Leta Miller Burwell. She is a member of the Native American Student Association at Southeastern.

DURANT, Okla. – Savannah Nicole Burwell of Ada, a sophomore business major at Southeastern Oklahoma State University, was selected Chickasaw Princess at the tribe’s 2013 annual meeting in September. Burwell is pictured with her parents, Jason and Leta Miller Burwell. She is a member of the Native American Student Association at Southeastern.

Southeastern to present series on children and society

DURANT, Okla. – Southeastern Oklahoma State University will present a series of lectures and arts events titled “Lost Child – A Multidisciplinary Reflection on Children and Society’’ —  in November.  The-two week series is designed to bring focus to society’s role and responsibility in safeguarding the wellbeing of its children.

               Presentations, lectures, and arts offerings will serve as the platform for this reflection with contributions from the departments of Art, Communication, and Theatre; English, Humanities and Languages; and Music.  Other speakers will be participating from the Denison Independent School District and the Chickasaw Nation.

 Admission to all events is free, though the Southeastern Chorale is asking for food donations from those attending their concert to go toward Families Feeding Families.  Additionally, the Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity of Southeastern Oklahoma State University will lead a food drive during the first two weeks of November as a service benefiting children in our area.

 A complete list of events includes:

Tuesday, November 5

       8:30 p.m. Playhouse Auditorium,  “Dance for the Lost Child” Arts Presentation, Theatre at Southeastern Dance Program,  Riley Risso, MFA – Director , Department of Art, Communication, and Theatre

 

Thursday, November 7 – 9:30 a.m. Student Union Auditorium,   “Infinite Hope | Malala’s Journey” – Presentation, Dr. Shannon McCraw with  Rylee Hendricks,

Sierra Kinnamon,  Hanna McMurtrey, Katrina Rose, Department of Art, Communication, and Theatre

 

Monday, November 11 – 3 p.m. Fine Arts Building Recital Hall, Dr. Jani Barker – Lecture Presentation               ,  “Risky Stories: Picture Book Art About the Endangered Child for the Child in Safety,”  Department of English, Humanities, and Languages                                                                       

Wednesday, November 13 – 3 p.m.  Fine Arts Building  Recital Hall, Dr. Meg Cotter- Lynch – Lecture Presentation,    “Earthly Mothers, Heavenly Father, and Children Left Behind,” Department of English, Humanities, and Languages

9 p.m.  Playhouse Lobby,    “A Child’s Journey” – Poet’s Coffee House, Theatre at Southeastern,  Kathleen Hardgrove. MFA -Project Director,

  Department of Art, Communication, and Theatre

 

Thursday, November 14 – 4 p.m. – Fine Arts Building  Room 116 –  Jackie Melancon MA, Med – Lecture Presentation,   “The Art of Teaching the Lost Child,’’ Denison Independent School District 

Tuesday, November 19 – 7:30 p.m.  Fine Arts Building  Recital Hall –    “Lost Child” – Arts Presentation,  Southeastern Chorale in Concert, Dr. Stacy Weger, Conductor,

Dr. Tristan Eggener, Accompanist, Department of Music

Please contact the Department of Music at 580-745-2088 or Southeastern Oklahoma State University at 580-745-2394  to request assistance due to a disability. Accommodations cannot be guaranteed without adequate advance notice.

Southeastern Symphonic Winds presents “parallels” on Nov. 14

DURANT, Okla. — The Southeastern Symphonic Winds – Southeastern Oklahoma State University’s premier instrumental ensemble – continues its 2013-2014 concert season with a program of emotionally charged music entitled “parallels” on Thursday, Nov. 14 at 7:30 p.m. in Montgomery Auditorium.

The event is free and open to the public.

The program includes works by Karel Husa, Kathryn Salfelder, Johann Sebastian Bach, John Mayrose, Vincent Persichetti, and Ron Nelson.

“This is a program of music that really explores some dark emotional territory,” said Dr. Jacob Wallace, Southeastern’s Director of Bands. Wallace. “The

idea of darkness shifting into light is a key element of the flow of the music. The idea is that by the end we’ve moved from anger and sorrow into expressions of joy.”

Joining the ensemble for this concert is Dr. Josh P. Byrd, Director of Bands at the University of West Georgia, who will conduct the group on Bach’s “Mein Jesu! was für Seelenweh.”

“Dr. Byrd is an outstanding young conductor in the wind band world, and I’m excited to have him work with our students,” Wallace said. “He’s an uncompromising musician and always a pleasure to work with. His energy and passion can really light up the stage, and I’m looking forward to seeing him make music here at Southeastern.”

The program mixes a collection old and new music, with recently composed works like Kathryn Salfelder’s “Crossing Parallels,’’a fantasia on Renaissance composer John Dowland’s “Flow my tears,” and John Mayrose’s post-minimalist “Bending Light’’ interspersed among classics of the repertoire such as Karel Husa’s “Smetana Fanfare’’ and Vincent Persichetti’s classic “Symphony for Band.’’ Ron Nelson’s ebullient “Sonoran Desert Holiday’’ closes the program.

The Southeastern Symphonic Winds is a performing ensemble consisting of Southeastern students and is open to qualified students in all disciplines pending competitive audition. For more information, please contact the Department of Music at 580-745-2088 or Dr. Wallace at 580-745-2084.

Native November events include Native American Symposium on Nov. 14-15

DURANT, Okla. – Southeastern Oklahoma State University is planning a number of special activities and events to celebrate “Native November.’’

Among the many highlights is the 10th Native American Symposium on Nov. 14-15.  The theme of this year’s symposium is “Native Ground: Protecting and Preserving History, Culture, and Customs.’’

The keynote speaker will be Dr. Brad Lieb from the Chickasaw Nation’s Division of History and Culture. He also serves as president of the Mississippi Association of Professional Archaeologists.

The banquet is scheduled for Thursday, Nov. 14 at 5:30 p.m. in the Ballroom on the Southeastern campus.

A number of interesting sessions will be held on art, film, history, politics, music, and recreation.  For a complete schedule of symposium events, go to homepages.se.edu/nas/

Other Native November events, sponsored by the Native American Center for Student Success, include:

  • Nov. 5: Native American Center for Student Success Open House Reception, 3-5 p.m.
  • Nov. 6: SE Live and Native American Visitation Day
  • Nov. 7: The Chickasaw Nation’s Cultural Renaissance and the Development of Family Ways of Thinking, Russell  Building 300, 2 p.m.
  • Nov. 9: Chickasaw Cultural Center Field Trip, Sulphur, Oklahoma
  • Nov. 12: Social Dancing and Stickball, Front Lawn, 3-5 p.m.
  • Nov. 19: Round Reed Basket Making, Magnolia Room, 2-4 p.m.
  • Nov. 21: Native Student Debate and Traditional Storytelling, Russell Building 300, 3-5 p.m.