Southeastern News

Southeastern celebrates initiatives, ribbon cutting of Center for Student Success

Oklahoma Chancellor Glen D. Johnson makes a point during Thursday’s program. Also on the program were, left to right, Regent Terry Matlock, Regent John Massey, Southeastern president Larry Minks, Chickasaw Nation Governor Bill Anoatubby, and Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma Chief Gregory Pyle.

Oklahoma Chancellor Glen D. Johnson makes a point during Thursday’s program. Also on the program were, left to right, Regent Terry Matlock, Regent John Massey, Southeastern president Larry Minks, Chickasaw Nation Governor Bill Anoatubby, and Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma Chief Gregory Pyle.

DURANT, Okla. – Dignitaries from throughout Oklahoma joined Chancellor Glen D. Johnson, regents, and tribal leaders Thursday for the “Celebration of Student Success Through Partnerships’’ event at Southeastern Oklahoma State University.

The celebration highlighted Oklahoma’s “Complete College America’’ (CCA) initiative with examples of successful programs and partnerships in place at Southeastern and around the state.

 

Activities began at 3 p.m. with a reception in the Glen D. Johnson Student Union loft while the program started at  3:30 p.m. in the atrium of the union.

Joining Chancellor Johnson on the program were Southeastern president Larry Minks, State Regent John Massey, Regional University System of Oklahoma Regent and Chair Terry Matlock, Chief Gregory Pyle of The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, and Governor Bill Anoatubby of the Chickasaw Nation.

Following this event, a ribbon cutting was held for the Center for Student Success building, located in the old Campus bookstore/Magnolia Room. This one-stop facility includes the Academic Advising and Outreach Center, the Native American Center for Student Success, the Learning Center, the Writing Center, and the Office of Freshman Programs.

At the beginning of the CCA initiative, state colleges and universities annually awarded 30,500 degrees. CCA’s goal is to increase that number 67 percent so that by 2023 Oklahoma colleges and universities will annually award 50,900 college degrees. During the 2011-12 academic year, state colleges and universities awarded 33,499 degrees/certificates.

Major initiatives toward this goal are already under way, including working with K-12 by focusing on college readiness, transforming remediation, expanding collaboration with CareerTech, enhancing adult degree completion efforts, and tracking and rewarding improvements in degree completion.

Due to Oklahoma’s high level of collaboration, policy framework and long-term commitment to completion goal, CCA has designated Oklahoma as its national model for degree completion.

Established in 2009, CCA is a national nonprofit organization working to significantly increase the number of Americans with a college degree. The organization focuses on state policy change and building consensus among state leaders, higher education and the national education policy community.

Dignitaries gather for the ribbon cutting at the Center for Student Success Thursday afternoon.

Dignitaries gather for the ribbon cutting at the Center for Student Success Thursday afternoon.

Students rank Academic Advising and Instructional Effectiveness high in importance and satisfaction

DURANT, Okla. – Academic Advising and Instructional Effectiveness ranked highest in importance and among the highest in satisfaction among students at Southeastern Oklahoma State University, according to a recent survey.

The Noel-Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory (SSI) was administered to 447 Southeastern students in the spring and fall of 2012. The SSI is one means that measures student satisfaction and priorities among various categories.

“I think it speaks highly of our students when they recognize the importance of advising and instruction to their overall success at the University,’’ said Dr. Jerry Polson, assistant vice president for academic outreach and research and dean of graduate studies. Polson has also served as a faculty member for 44 years.

“The Noel-Levitz data seems to indicate that Southeastern’s students are quite pleased with the quality of instruction they are receiving at the University,’’ Polson added. “This satisfaction is probably due to a number of factors, including a highly trained faculty, small class sizes, and the personal attention provided students by their instructors.”

The survey indicated that students believed that the content of the courses within their majors is valuable, and that the instruction is excellent in their major fields/most of their classes. These results from SSI would seem to be in line with the University’s mission of providing “an environment of academic excellence.’’

Students were also pleased with the assistance they received from academic advising. They noted that their academic advisor is approachable, knowledgeable about their major, and concerned about their success as an individual.

“At Southeastern, we realize how important academic advising is to our students and take great pride in the advising services provided,’’ said Tim Boatmun, associate dean of academic services. “Students consistently say they want individualized attention from a faculty member or professional staff. Academic advising is the primary activity in which students receive one-on-one attention from a professional attempting to help them reach their goals.’’

Overall results from the survey indicate that students at Southeastern are satisfied that the University is meeting and in many cases, exceeding their expectations.  In fact, student satisfaction is higher at Southeastern when compared to results nationally at other four-year institutions.

Southeastern students also reported higher satisfaction than the national average in such areas as Safety & Security, Recruitment and Financial Aid, Campus Support Services, Campus Climate, Student Centeredness, Service Excellence, Concern for the Individual, and Campus Life.

Chancellor Johnson to provide update on higher education at Southeastern event on Jan. 24

DURANT, Okla. – Chancellor Glen D. Johnson, regents, and tribal leaders are scheduled to be on the program Jan. 24 for “The Celebration of Student Success Through Partnerships’’ event at Southeastern Oklahoma State University.

This event will also highlight Oklahoma’s “Complete College America’’ (CCA) initiative with examples of successful programs and partnerships in place at Southeastern and around the state.

 

Activities begin at 3 p.m. with a reception in the Glen D. Johnson Student Union loft, while the program begins at 3:30 p.m. in the atrium of the union.

Scheduled to be on the program with Southeastern president Larry Minks are Chancellor Johnson, State Regent John Massey, Regional University System of Oklahoma Regent and Chair Terry Matlock, Chief Gregory Pyle of The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, and Governor Bill Anoatubby of the Chickasaw Nation.

At the event, Chancellor Johnson will provide an update on higher education as well as the CCA initiative.

At the inception of the initiative, state colleges and universities annually awarded 30,500 degrees. CCA’s goal is to increase that number 67 percent so that by 2023 Oklahoma colleges and universities will annually award 50,900 college degrees. During the 2011-12 academic year, state colleges and universities awarded 33,499 degrees/ certificates.

Major initiatives toward this goal are already under way, including working with K-12 by focusing on college readiness, transforming remediation, expanding collaboration with CareerTech, enhancing adult degree completion efforts, and tracking and rewarding improvements in degree completion.

Due to Oklahoma’s high level of collaboration, policy framework and long-term commitment to completion goal, CCA has designated Oklahoma as its national model for degree completion.

Established in 2009, CCA is a national nonprofit organization working to significantly increase the number of Americans with a college degree. The organization focuses on state policy change and building consensus among state leaders, higher education and the national education policy community.

Following this event, a ribbon-cutting for the Center for Student Success building, located in the old Campus bookstore/Magnolia Room, will be held at approximately 4 p.m. This one-stop facility includes the Academic Advising and Outreach Center, the Native American Center for Student Success, the Learning Center, the Writing Center, and the Office of Freshman Programs. Tours of the facility will also be offered.

The public is invited to attend both events.

Survey reveals Southeastern ranks high in student satisfaction

DURANT, Okla. – The survey says that students at Southeastern Oklahoma State University are satisfied that the University is meeting and, in many cases, exceeding their expectations.  In fact, student satisfaction is higher at Southeastern when compared to results nationally at other four-year institutions.

The Noel-Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory (SSI) was administered to 447 Southeastern students in the spring and fall of 2012. The SSI is one tool utilized in assessing student satisfaction and priorities among various categories.

 

When asked if their college experience has met their expectations so far, 88% of Southeastern respondents said expectations were met or exceeded, compared

to the national satisfaction average of 84%.

According to the survey results, Southeastern students listed the following categories as most important: Academic Advising, Instructional Effectiveness, Safety and Security, Registration Effectiveness, Recruitment and Financial Aid. In all five areas, Southeastern rated above the national average in satisfaction percentages.

Among the highest level of satisfaction were Academic Advising and Institutional Effectiveness – the two categories that Southeastern students also ranked as most important.

Southeastern students also gave the University high marks in such categories as Concern for the Individual, Student Centeredness, Registration Effectiveness, Recruitment and Financial Aid, Campus Life, and Service Excellence.

“I think these survey results confirm that our students are pleased with the quality of educational opportunities they are being afforded at the University,’’ said Southeastern president Larry Minks. “We strive to provide an environment and support system that assists students in reaching their highest level of potential, both in and out of the classroom.  As we recruit new students, we emphasize the importance of the individual attention they will receive from their professors and advisors at Southeastern.  The results are also a reflection of the dedication of the faculty and staff that we have in place at Southeastern.’’

This is the first time the SSI has been administered to Southeastern students since 2007.

Kathy Jo Daniel, a junior nursing major from Coleman, Oklahoma, says Southeastern has more than met her expectations.

“Academically, it has definitely met my expectations – all of my biology classes have been very challenging, but also very rewarding. I chose Southeastern for several reasons: First of all, I wanted to stay close to home.  I came from a small school (graduating class of nine) and if I had questions I wanted to be able to visit with my professors outside the classroom.  And I knew Southeastern would have all the classes I needed for my major.’’

Daniel is a member of the President’s Leadership Class (PLC) and also received the O.J. Harvey Native American scholarship. Last fall, she was honored with the Top 10 Freshmen Award. Outside the classroom, she is employed in the Southeastern Admissions Office, where she assists prospective students in a variety of ways.

Daniel’s parents are also Southeastern graduates.

Katie Whitley, a freshman from Durant, has also been pleased with her experiences at Southeastern.

The Durant High School graduate is undecided on a major, but in addition to her studies, has been active in the Student Government Association and PLC.

“I’ve only been here one semester, but I have been able to meet new friends and build new relationships in my classes and through my involvement with SGA and PLC,’’ she said. “I looked at a couple of other schools, but I wanted a smaller school with familiar surroundings.’’

Like Daniel, Whitley’s parents are Southeastern graduates.