Southeastern News

Native American Symposium scheduled for Nov. 3

DURANT, Okla. – Southeastern Oklahoma State University will host the 12th Native American Symposium: Representations and Realities on Friday, November 3.

The Symposium will feature presentations and discussions on Native American literature, history, education, science, religion, art and film.

All events in the Glen D. Johnson Student Union are free and open to the public.

The Symposium begins at 9 a.m. Friday, November 3, with Native Politics and Native Veterans. It includes such offerings as Native Education and Native History.

Lunch in the loft is scheduled for noon with featured speaker Dr. Amanda Cobb-Greetham in the student union auditorium at 1 p.m. She is the director of the Native Nations Center at the University of Oklahoma and a graduate of Southeastern.

The event closes with the showing of Atanarjuat:  The Fast Runner, the first full-length film ever to be written, directed and acted entirely in the Inuit language.

For more information, contact Dr. Mark Spencer at 580-745-2921 or visit the website at http://www.se.edu/nas/.

Native November events include Native American Symposium on Nov. 14-15

DURANT, Okla. – Southeastern Oklahoma State University is planning a number of special activities and events to celebrate “Native November.’’

Among the many highlights is the 10th Native American Symposium on Nov. 14-15.  The theme of this year’s symposium is “Native Ground: Protecting and Preserving History, Culture, and Customs.’’

The keynote speaker will be Dr. Brad Lieb from the Chickasaw Nation’s Division of History and Culture. He also serves as president of the Mississippi Association of Professional Archaeologists.

The banquet is scheduled for Thursday, Nov. 14 at 5:30 p.m. in the Ballroom on the Southeastern campus.

A number of interesting sessions will be held on art, film, history, politics, music, and recreation.  For a complete schedule of symposium events, go to homepages.se.edu/nas/

Other Native November events, sponsored by the Native American Center for Student Success, include:

  • Nov. 5: Native American Center for Student Success Open House Reception, 3-5 p.m.
  • Nov. 6: SE Live and Native American Visitation Day
  • Nov. 7: The Chickasaw Nation’s Cultural Renaissance and the Development of Family Ways of Thinking, Russell  Building 300, 2 p.m.
  • Nov. 9: Chickasaw Cultural Center Field Trip, Sulphur, Oklahoma
  • Nov. 12: Social Dancing and Stickball, Front Lawn, 3-5 p.m.
  • Nov. 19: Round Reed Basket Making, Magnolia Room, 2-4 p.m.
  • Nov. 21: Native Student Debate and Traditional Storytelling, Russell Building 300, 3-5 p.m.

Native American Symposium to focus on preservation of history, culture

DURANT, Okla. – Southeastern Oklahoma State University will host the 10th Native American Symposium on Nov. 14-15.  The theme of this year’s symposium is “Native Ground: Protecting and Preserving History, Culture, and Customs.’’

 

The keynote speaker will be Dr. Brad Lieb from the Chickasaw Nation’s Division of History and Culture. He also serves as president of the Mississippi Association of Professional Archaeologists.

The banquet is scheduled for Thursday, Nov. 14 at 5:30 p.m. in the Ballroom on the Southeastern campus.

A number of interesting sessions will be held on art, film, history, politics, music, and recreation.  For a complete schedule of symposium events, go to homepages.se.edu/nas/

Southeastern ranks 6th nationally in producing Native American graduates

DURANT, Okla. — Once again, Southeastern Oklahoma State University has been recognized nationally for its work with Native American students.

According to “Diverse Issues In Higher Education,’’ Southeastern  ranks sixth in  the nation in producing Native American graduates (all disciplines combined) in the Baccalaureate degree category. (Last year, Southeastern ranked 10th in all disciplines combined).

In the undergraduate category, Southeastern has 14 different fields represented in the national top 30. The University ranks number one in  Engineering Technologies and Engineering-related fields (Occupational Safety & Health).

In the graduate category, Southeastern is also ranked number one in Engineering Technologies and Engineering-related fields (Occupational Safety & Health).

Each year, the magazine publishes its top 100 rankings of minority graduates. The report is based on preliminary data from the U.S. Department of Education.

“It is a real honor for Southeastern to be recognized in this manner,’’ said Southeastern president Larry Minks.  “We have a number of programs in place to assist our Native American students as they work toward their goals. We are also fortunate to have partnerships in place with The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma and the Chickasaw Nation that directly benefit our students.’’

In 2011, the University received a $2 million federal grant to enhance the academic success of its Native American students. The five-year Title III grant was awarded by the U.S. Department of Education. This “Connect2Complete (C2C) Project” strives to bolster the retention rates and graduation rates of Native American students at Southeastern.

Currently, approximately 30 percent of Southeastern’s enrollment is comprised of Native Americans.

Also, the Southeastern Native American Center for Student Success provides advisement and assistance in accessing external funding for Native American students. The center houses staff from the Choctaw Nation Scholarship Advisement Program and the Chickasaw Nation Education Services and offers a College Success course for new freshmen.

Southeastern also offers a Native American Studies minor, Native American management option, and courses in Choctaw Language and Culture.

Each year, Southeastern partners with the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma to sponsor “Native American Visitation Day,” in which high school students experience the college setting.

Among other activities, the University hosts the Native American Symposium – this year’s event is scheduled for Nov. 14-15.

Following are Southeastern’s national rankings, by major, in the top 100 degree producers list as released by “Diverse Issues In Higher Education.’’

Undergraduate (Native American unless otherwise specified)

1 – Engineering Technologies and Engineering-related fields (Occupational Safety & Health)

2 – Communication, Journalism, and related programs

2 – Education

2 – Psychology

3 – Finance and Financial Management Services

3 – Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Studies and Humanities

4 – Biological and Biomedical Sciences

6 – All Disciplines combined

6 – English Language and Literature/Letters

6 – History

8 – Parks, Recreation, Leisure, and Fitness Studies

10 – Computer and Information Sciences and Support Services

12 – Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support services

13 – Homeland Security, Law Enforcement, Firefighting and Related Protective Services (Criminal Justice)

27 – Engineering Technologies and Engineering-Related Fields (Occupational Safety & Health — Total Minority category)

Graduate (Native American unless otherwise specified)

1Engineering Technologies and Engineering-related fields (Occupational Safety & Health)

13 – All Disciplines combined

13 – Education

15 – Business Administration, Management and Operations

18 – Business, Management, Marketing, and related support services

45 – Engineering Technologies and Engineering related fields (Occupational Safety & Health — Total Minority)

63 – Engineering (Aerospace Administration and Logistics — African American)

75 – Engineering (Aerospace Administration and Logistics — Hispanic)

Native American Symposium Speaker

Native American Symposium Speaker

Press Release Date: 11-7-2011

 

DURANT, Okla. – Distinguished educator and scholar Dr. Henrietta (Henri) Mann was the keynote speaker Friday at Southeastern Oklahoma State University’s Native American Symposium and Film Festival. A leading advocate of tribal education, Mann is currently serving as founding president of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribal College. The ninth annual symposium featured presentations on Native American literature, history, sociology, education, science, art, and film.