Southeastern News

Southeastern ranks seventh nationally in graduating Native American students

DURANT, Okla. – Southeastern Oklahoma State University continues to rank among the nation’s leaders in producing Native American graduates.

According to the latest rankings by Diverse Issues In Higher Education, Southeastern is seventh in the nation for graduating Native American students (baccalaureate) in all disciplines combined.

The University is number one in the Occupational Safety & Health field, and  number two in three other areas – Chemistry; Health, Physical  Education,  and Recreation;  and Communication.

Southeastern also ranks in the top 10 nationally in a number of other disciplines, including Marketing, Liberal and Applied Studies, Accounting, Psychology, Education,  all business-related programs,  and Computer Science and Computer Information Systems.

On the graduate level, Southeastern is top-ranked in Occupational Safety & Health, second in Health, Physical Education,  & Recreation, and 20th in all disciplines combined.

Approximately 30% of Southeastern’s current enrollment is comprised of Native American students.

Listed below are Southeastern’s programs that correspond to the top 10 rankings on the latest Diverse Issues in Higher Education list:

Baccalaureate

1 – Occupational Safety & Health
2 — Chemistry
2 – Health & Physical Education, Recreation
2 — Communication
3 — Marketing
3 — Liberal and Applied Studies
4 — Accounting
4 — Psychology
4 — Education
9 – Business programs – Accounting, Finance, Management, Marketing, General Business
9 — Computer Science and Computer Information Systems

Graduate (Master’s)

1 – Occupational Safety & Health
2 – Sports Studies and Athletic Administration

 

Source: Diverse: Issues In Higher Education analysis of U.S. Department of Education reportssubmitted by institutions.

 

Open House held for Native American Collection & Commons at Southeastern

DURANT, Okla. – An open house for the new Native American Collection & Commons in the Henry G. Bennett Memorial Library was held Tuesday at Southeastern Oklahoma State University. The Collection houses historical government documents, pre-statehood and early statehood maps, Indian Territory newspapers and much more. Display items are from The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma and the Chickasaw Nation. Funding for the Commons and Collection was made possible by the Title III, NASNTI Connect2Complete grant and Southeastern Oklahoma State University.

NA Library PanoNA Library-2

SE Live/Native American Visitation Day scheduled for February 5

DURANT, Okla. – Southeastern Oklahoma State University has scheduled the SE Live Open House and Native American Visitation Day for Wednesday, February 5, on the Durant campus.

Registration begins at 8:15 a.m., with the Welcome Session beginning at 9 a.m. in Montgomery Auditorium.

Native American Visitation Day allows students the opportunity to learn about Native American benefits, attend a class on Native American studies, and play a traditional game of stickball.

High school seniors and juniors, along with their parents and families, are

invited to experience life as a student at Southeastern during SE Live Open House.

More than 250 students attended the event this past fall.

“Students who come to SE Live will get the chance to attend college classes, meet current students, and really experience what life is like as a Southeastern student,” said Southeastern recruiter Hope Zachary.

Highlights include programs on Scholarships and Financial Aid, Southeastern Traditions, Residence Life, and Life as a Student Athlete. Campus tours will be offered throughout the day.

In the afternoon, students will have the opportunity to visit Eaker Field, home of the award-winning Southeastern Aviation Program.

Choir and band students will have a chance to rehearse with those programs and audition for music scholarships in the fall.

Entertainment throughout the day will be provided by performing groups from Southeastern, including the Sparks Dance Team, Cheer Squad, Emalea Hudgens, and the True Blue Ambassadors.

All students attending the event will receive an SE Sackpack and one free lunch ticket. Lunch is sponsored by Durant’s First United Bank.

To view an event schedule, get directions and register, go online to www.SE.edu/SELive or contact the Admissions and Recruitment Office at 580-745-2060.

RUSO Impact Report Shows Nearly All Grads Stay in State

OKLAHOMA CITY – More than 90 percent of all Oklahoma regional university graduates stay in the state after receiving their diploma, a number greater than the Oklahoma higher education average. The Regional University System of Oklahoma recently reported this and other 2013 results at its annual legislative briefing. The event was to inform legislators and higher education officials of the cumulative efforts and impact of the state’s largest four-year system.

The Regional University System of Oklahoma is made up of six regional universities: East Central University, Northeastern State University, Northwestern Oklahoma State University, Southeastern Oklahoma State University, Southwestern Oklahoma State University, University of Central Oklahoma and 10 satellite locations.

Richard Ogden, chairman of the Board of Regents, Regional University System of Oklahoma, said the institutions fill an educational gap not provided by Oklahoma research universities or community colleges. The universities are designed to provide access to students who need to stay near their home communities or cannot attend farther away due to job, family or financial circumstances.

“Regional universities provide opportunities to the widest range of students to earn high-quality accredited four-year degrees through classroom and online instruction,” said Ogden.

“Our students become our state’s teachers and nurses, NASA engineers, rock stars, pharmacists and optometrists.”

As a member of the Regional University System of Oklahoma, Southeastern president Larry Minks believes his school has a lot to offer its students.

“We pride ourselves on offering a quality education at an affordable cost,’’ he said. “Our students also experience one-on-one instruction from their professors. We have a number of innovative programs in place to meet the needs of our students, including a new agreement with American Eagle Airlines  to assist our aviation students. And with several programs already implemented to aid our Native American students, we have become a national leader in producing Native American graduates.’’

Southeastern holds a number of specialty accreditations, including The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International (John Massey School of Business) and the Council for Accreditation of Counseling & Related Educational Programs.

Nearly 40 percent of all Oklahoma college graduates graduate from a regional institution. Last year the Regional University System of Oklahoma graduate total was 7,058, up 644 graduates from the previous year.

In the briefing Ogden pointed to the fact that regional institutions performed significantly better than the national average in most cost categories. In 2013, the average annual cost of attendance at an Oklahoma regional university was nearly half the cost, $11,637 compared to $23,200 nationally as reported by CNN Money. Oklahoma regional university students leave college with 23 percent less debt than the national average and more than 40 percent of the graduates manage to leave without any debt.

One area where being less than the national average is not beneficial was in the percentage of state appropriations. Taxpayer investment in higher education in Oklahoma is 31 percent below the national average. The average national taxpayer investment per student is $6,000 compared to the Oklahoma average of $4,100 per student. The cost difference is passed on to the students, further raising the affordability barrier. Students who attend regional institutions already personally pay more than half of their total education costs.

“The highest quality of higher education still needs to be affordable, or it doesn’t serve its purpose,” said Ogden. “It is critical the Regional University System of Oklahoma regents continue to be good stewards of the money appropriated to us.”

More than 60 percent of the regional universities’ budgets are spent on instruction and research, followed by physical plant operations, 12 percent, student services, 9 percent and scholarships, 8 percent.

Ogden reported that the Regional University System of Oklahoma cost saving and efficiencies have saved taxpayers more than $47 million through energy initiatives, reduced administrative expenses and information technology savings. Costs are also offset by seeking research funding to supplement state appropriations.  Last year regional university institutions received more than $33 million in grants.

The legislative briefing concluded with two regional students, Simone Goelz, University of Central Oklahoma, and Blaine Boyd, Southwestern Oklahoma State University, discussing their experiences at regional universities. Goelz, who is pursuing a bachelor’s degree in organizational leadership after more than a decade out of high school, said the Regional University System of Oklahoma is making a difference with adult learners. “With higher education comes confidence and belief in oneself to achieve goals and pursue dreams — that begins a long-term and permanent change in strengthening Oklahoma families,” said Goelz.

ABOUT:

The Regional University System of Oklahoma governs the six regional universities: East Central University, Northeastern State University, Northwestern Oklahoma State University, Southeastern Oklahoma State University, Southwestern Oklahoma State University and the University of Central Oklahoma. It was created on July 6, 1948.  All the universities of the Regional University System are more than 100 years old. For more information about the Regional University System of Oklahoma and its graduates, visit www.ruso.edu.

Southeastern ranks 6th nationally in producing Native American graduates

DURANT, Okla. — Once again, Southeastern Oklahoma State University has been recognized nationally for its work with Native American students.

According to “Diverse Issues In Higher Education,’’ Southeastern  ranks sixth in  the nation in producing Native American graduates (all disciplines combined) in the Baccalaureate degree category. (Last year, Southeastern ranked 10th in all disciplines combined).

In the undergraduate category, Southeastern has 14 different fields represented in the national top 30. The University ranks number one in  Engineering Technologies and Engineering-related fields (Occupational Safety & Health).

In the graduate category, Southeastern is also ranked number one in Engineering Technologies and Engineering-related fields (Occupational Safety & Health).

Each year, the magazine publishes its top 100 rankings of minority graduates. The report is based on preliminary data from the U.S. Department of Education.

“It is a real honor for Southeastern to be recognized in this manner,’’ said Southeastern president Larry Minks.  “We have a number of programs in place to assist our Native American students as they work toward their goals. We are also fortunate to have partnerships in place with The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma and the Chickasaw Nation that directly benefit our students.’’

In 2011, the University received a $2 million federal grant to enhance the academic success of its Native American students. The five-year Title III grant was awarded by the U.S. Department of Education. This “Connect2Complete (C2C) Project” strives to bolster the retention rates and graduation rates of Native American students at Southeastern.

Currently, approximately 30 percent of Southeastern’s enrollment is comprised of Native Americans.

Also, the Southeastern Native American Center for Student Success provides advisement and assistance in accessing external funding for Native American students. The center houses staff from the Choctaw Nation Scholarship Advisement Program and the Chickasaw Nation Education Services and offers a College Success course for new freshmen.

Southeastern also offers a Native American Studies minor, Native American management option, and courses in Choctaw Language and Culture.

Each year, Southeastern partners with the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma to sponsor “Native American Visitation Day,” in which high school students experience the college setting.

Among other activities, the University hosts the Native American Symposium – this year’s event is scheduled for Nov. 14-15.

Following are Southeastern’s national rankings, by major, in the top 100 degree producers list as released by “Diverse Issues In Higher Education.’’

Undergraduate (Native American unless otherwise specified)

1 – Engineering Technologies and Engineering-related fields (Occupational Safety & Health)

2 – Communication, Journalism, and related programs

2 – Education

2 – Psychology

3 – Finance and Financial Management Services

3 – Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Studies and Humanities

4 – Biological and Biomedical Sciences

6 – All Disciplines combined

6 – English Language and Literature/Letters

6 – History

8 – Parks, Recreation, Leisure, and Fitness Studies

10 – Computer and Information Sciences and Support Services

12 – Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support services

13 – Homeland Security, Law Enforcement, Firefighting and Related Protective Services (Criminal Justice)

27 – Engineering Technologies and Engineering-Related Fields (Occupational Safety & Health — Total Minority category)

Graduate (Native American unless otherwise specified)

1Engineering Technologies and Engineering-related fields (Occupational Safety & Health)

13 – All Disciplines combined

13 – Education

15 – Business Administration, Management and Operations

18 – Business, Management, Marketing, and related support services

45 – Engineering Technologies and Engineering related fields (Occupational Safety & Health — Total Minority)

63 – Engineering (Aerospace Administration and Logistics — African American)

75 – Engineering (Aerospace Administration and Logistics — Hispanic)

Southeastern to host Native American Students In Higher Education Conference

DURANT, Okla. – Southeastern Oklahoma State University will host the Oklahoma Native American Students in Higher Education (ONASHE) Conference February 22-23.

The goal of the conference is to provide opportunities for Native American students and professionals from various institutions across the state of Oklahoma to continue to develop and strengthen their leadership skills by interacting with current tribal leaders, participating in workshops relevant to contemporary student and leadership issues, and creating powerful networks promoting higher education for Native American students.

The theme for the 2013 ONASHE conference is “The Roots of Our Generation Perpetuating Unification.”

“The conference provides an excellent opportunity to Oklahoma Native American college students to explore potential careers while connecting those careers and their education to cultural interests,” said Chris Wesberry, director of the Southeastern Native American Center for Student Success.

Following is the schedule of events:

Friday, February 22

2 p.m. – Registration in the Glen D. Johnson Student Union

3 p.m. – Parade of Flags: Tribal Nations and Institutions will bring their own flag, pole and base. Traditional dress will be worn and student representatives will post the flags. Boy Scouts Pack 618 will post U.S. and State flags: Lord’s Prayer, Choctaw Nation Royalty

3:30 p.m. –Welcome (GDJ Student Union auditorium): Southeastern president Larry Minks will present the welcome; Keynote speaker will be Gary Batton, Assistant Chief of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma

4:15 p.m. – Icebreakers

4:45 p.m. – Roundtable Discussions

6:30 p.m. – Dinner

7:30 p.m. – Choctaw Social Dance

Saturday, February 23

9 a.m. – Opening Session (GDJ Student Union auditorium): Keynote speaker will be Rev. Jay Mule, minister and educator

10 a.m. – Workshops, Session I

11 a.m. – Workshops, Session II

Noon – Lunch: Keynote speaker will be Quinton Roman Nose, Native American educator

1 p.m. – Workshops, Session III

2 p.m. – Awards Ceremony: Keynote speaker will be Cherrah Giles, Secretary of the Department of Community & Human Services, Muscogee Creek Nation

3 p.m. — Stickball

SE Live, Native American Visitation Day set for November 7

DURANT, Okla. – Southeastern Oklahoma State University has scheduled the SE Live Open House and Native American Visitation Day for Wednesday, Nov. 7, on the Durant campus.

Native American Visitation Day allows students the opportunity to learn about Native American benefits, attend a class on Native American studies, and play a traditional game of stickball.

High school seniors and juniors, along with their parents and families, are invited to experience life as a student at Southeastern during SE Live Open House.

More than 500 students attended last year’s event.

“Students who come to SE Live will get the chance to attend college classes, meet current students and really experience what life is like as a Southeastern student,” said Southeastern recruiter Amity Smith.

Highlights include programs on Scholarships and Financial Aid, Southeastern Traditions, Residence Life, and Life as a Student Athlete. Campus tours will be offered throughout the day.

In the afternoon, students will have the opportunity to visit Eaker Field, home of the award-winning Southeastern Aviation Program.

Choir and band students will have a chance to rehearse with those programs and audition for music scholarships in the fall.

Entertainment throughout the day will be provided by performing groups from Southeastern, including the Sparks Dance Team, Chorvettes Stageworks Company, Cheer Squad, Cat 5, and the band.

All students attending the event will receive an SE Sackpack and one free lunch ticket. Lunch is sponsored by Durant’s First United Bank.

To view an event schedule, get directions and register, go online to www.SE.edu/SELive or contact the Admissions and Recruitment Office at 580-745-2060.

Southeastern participates in National Indian Education Association convention

Representing Southeastern at the NIEA convention were, left to right, Troy Ward, Chantelle Standefer, Caley Wesberry, Anthony Nonahan, Dakota Estrada, Brenner Builly, Leslie Wesberry Ethan Ruth, Evan Staples, Jennifer Kemp, and Robert Ferguson.

DURANT, Okla. – Southeastern Oklahoma State University was well represented at the 43rd annual National Indian Education Association convention and trade show.

The event was held Oct. 18-21 at the Cox Convention Center in Oklahoma City. “Maintaining Traditions in a Digital Era’’ was the theme of this year’s convention.

Southeastern president Larry Minks joined more than a dozen students, faculty, and staff from the University in participating. Some 2,500 people attended the convention, which provided opportunities for visibility, networking and recruiting.  A number of workshops and forums were offered as well.

Representatives from Southeastern presented four workshops, and Chris Wesberry, Director of Southeastern’s Native American Excellence in Education program, also participated in a one-hour live “Native America Calling’’ radio broadcast.

President Minks spent two days assisting in the Southeastern recruitment booth.

Southeastern ranks annually among the nation’s leading universities in producing Native American graduates. Approximately 30 percent of Southeastern students are Native American.

“The conference provided an excellent opportunity for our students, staff, and faculty to learn and share with other Native people who attend higher education or work as professionals in Indian Education,’’ Wesberry said. “The workshops that we held were well attended and we had a great response from fellow educators regarding President Minks being in attendance.’’

Workshop presenters from Southeastern included Wesberry, “Creating a Native American Center for Student Success: Why, How, What;’’ Academic Advisor Chantelle Standefer, “Facilitating the Development of Culturally Competent Educators;’’ and Academic Advisor/Retention Specialist Jennifer Kemp, “Improving Retention Rates Among Native American Students.’’

Kathleen Hardgrove, Assistant Professor in the Department of Arts, Communication and Theatre at Southeastern, and a group of students presented the play “To Us It Wasn’t Code.” This is a collaboration between Southeastern students and the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma on the Code Talkers of World War II, which debuted to high acclaim at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian as part of last summer’s Choctaw Days.

Also attending from Southeastern were Liz McCraw, Dean of Enrollment Management, and Tim Boatmun, Associate Dean of Academic Services.

Incorporated in 1970, NIEA is the oldest education organization focused on advancing education for Native students.

Southeastern hosts professional development on Native American culture, education

Dr. Rockey Robbins presented a workshop to faculty and staff members.

DURANT, Okla. – Southeastern Oklahoma State University recently hosted professional development sessions related to Native American culture as it relates specifically to education.

The sessions were sponsored by the Connect2Complete Project, Title III grant through the Native American Center for Student Success.

Faculty and staff in attendance were from the John Massey School of Business/Aviation, EHL, Social Sciences, CC&PS, HPER, Math, Biological Sciences/Behavioral Sciences, Native American Center for Student Success, Counseling Center, Academic Advising and Outreach Center, Admissions and Recruitment, and Registrar.

The two sessions were led by Dr. Rockey Robbins, a faculty member at the University of Oklahoma with primary interest in American Indian psychological issues including grandparenting, assessment, treatment, academic motivation and group interventions.

The first session, “Promoting Tribal/Cultural Competency in the Classroom,” included thought-provoking activities relating to values, personal experiences, empathy and the value of laughter.

The second session, “Mentoring Native American College Students,” identified stages of the mentoring process, positive mentoring qualities, and how a Native American perspective on mentoring might look.

Corie Delashaw, Instructor in the Department of Social Sciences, said, “I tried the exercise Dr. Robbins taught us. It was in my Native American History class and it went very well. Many of the students said they felt the loss when one of those cherished values was taken away.”

Southeastern will host Dr. Betsy Barefoot Oct. 3 as part of the Connect2Complete Project.

She will speak about the importance of the first-year experience and how it relates to retention. Her presentation will be most relevant to those faculty teaching 1000- and 2000-level courses.

All faculty, however, are welcome and encouraged to attend. Please RSVP to Dean Lucretia Scoufos’ office. A formal announcement will be made via e-mail.

Southeastern ranks in top 10 nationally for producing Native American graduates

DURANT, Okla. – According to the latest rankings in Diverse Issues In Higher Education, Southeastern Oklahoma State University is among the top schools in the nation for producing Native American graduates. In the undergraduate category, Southeastern has nine different fields represented in the national top 10; in the graduate degree category, Southeastern has three programs recognized in the top 10. The University ranks number one in Occupational Safety & Health (undergraduate and graduate) and 10th in the nation in all disciplines combined (undergraduate).

“It is a great honor for us to be recognized nationally for our work with Native American students,” said Southeastern president Larry Minks. “What is most impressive to me is the number of different subject areas that are represented in the rankings. We have a number of programs in place, including the U.S. Department of Education grant that we received last year, to assist students. The Native American Center for Student Success continues to do an outstanding job as well. Finally, we are very appreciative to have tremendous support from the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma and the Chickasaw Nation. The partnerships that have been established with both nations make a tremendous difference in the lives of our students.”

Each year, the magazine publishes its top 100 rankings of minority graduates. The report is based on preliminary data from the U.S. Department of Education for the 2010-11 school year. Following are Southeastern’s national rankings, by field, in the top 100 degree producers list (Native American students) as released by Diverse Issues In Higher Education.

Undergraduate 1 — Engineering Technologies and Engineering Related Fields (Occupational Safety and Health) 2 — Communication, Journalism, and Related Programs 3 — Transportation and Materials Moving (Aviation) 4 — Education 4 — Psychology 5 — Parks, Recreation, Leisure and Fitness Studies 7 — Marketing 8 — Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Studies, and Humanities 9 — Biological and Biomedical Sciences 10 — All Disciplines Combined

Graduate 1 — Engineering (Occupational Safety & Health) 4 — Psychology (Clinical Mental Heath Counseling) 8 — Education 11 — All Disciplines Combined

Southeastern has a number of programs and initiatives in place to assist Native American students. Last year, the University received a $2 million federal grant to enhance the academic success of its Native American students. The five-year, $1,995,623 Title III grant was awarded by the U.S. Department of Education. Chris Wesberry, Native American Center for Student Success coordinator, was principal investigator for the project, and Tim Boatmun, Associate Dean for Academic Services, was co-principal investigator. Also assisting in writing the proposal was Paul Buntz, grant coordinator-writer.

The “Connect2Complete (C2C) Project” strives to bolster the retention rates and graduation rates of Native American students at Southeastern. Currently, approximately 30 percent of Southeastern’s enrollment is comprised of Native Americans.

Also, the Southeastern Native American Center for Student Success provides advisement and assistance in accessing external funding for Native American students. The center also houses staff from the Choctaw Nation Scholarship Advisement Program and the Chickasaw Nation Education Services and offers a College Success course for new freshmen.

The Center is home to the “Native American Excellence in Education” grant funded by the Office of Indian Education to assist with preparing future Native American educators.

Southeastern also offers a Native American Studies minor, Native American management option and four courses in Choctaw Language and Culture.

Each year, Southeastern partners with the Choctaw Nation to sponsor “Native American Visitation Day,” in which high school students experience the college setting.

Among other activities, the University hosts the Native American Symposium and Film Festival.