Southeastern News

Occupational Safety & Health hosts Career Fair

The Occupational Safety & Health Department recently hosted a career fair.

The Occupational Safety & Health Department recently hosted a career fair.

By UNIVERSITY COMMUNICATIONS

DURANT, Okla. – The Department of Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) at Southeastern Oklahoma State University recently hosted its annual semester Career Fair. Eight companies participated in an effort to scout out potential interns and new hires.

Those in attendance included Texas Instruments, Brandt Construction, Cadence McShane, Dal-Tile, Granite Construction, Hensel Phelps Construction,  McCarthy Construction, and Northstar Builders Group.

This departmental career fair was implemented two semesters ago in response to the high demand by companies for OSH students to fill positions and

internships. Other companies that have recently been on campus doing informational sessions and interviews include Amazon and Barnard Construction.

Safety Engineers president addresses Southeastern students

DURANT, Okla. – Jim Smith, who serves as president of the American Society of Safety Engineers, addresses a crowd of 150 safety students Wednesday at Southeastern Oklahoma State University.  Smith is the director of risk control services for Arthur J. Gallagher Risk Management Services.  He related his experiences in the safety field, along with observations on job opportunities for current and future graduates. There are currently more than 400 undergraduate and graduate majors in the Occupational Safety & Health program at Southeastern.

Southeastern to host president of American Society of Safety Engineers at campus speaking event

DURANT, Okla. – The Department of Occupational Safety & Health – which offers one of the most popular majors at Southeastern Oklahoma State University – is hosting a special speaker on campus.

Jim Smith, who serves as president of the American Society of Safety Engineers, will be speaking to safety students on “The Future of Safety.’’ The event is scheduled for Wednesday, April 25, at 2 p.m. in the Hallie McKinney Ballroom.

Smith is the director of risk control services for Arthur J. Gallagher Risk Management Services. He is a professional member of Region IV and an ASSE member for 30 years.

“It’s a rare event when the ASSE national president chooses to visit any university program,’’ said Dr. Chris Bradshaw, chair of the Department of Occupational Safety & Health at Southeastern. “We are honored and excited that our students will be able to experience this opportunity to hear a national representative of the safety profession speak in person. Mr. Smith’s influence in setting the national safety agenda in Washington and his role as the safety director for the largest safety consulting company in the U.S. will surely offer an interesting perspective for our students on the future of safety.’’

Founded in 1911, the American Society of Safety Engineers is the world’s oldest professional safety society. ASSE promotes the expertise, leadership and commitment of its members, while providing them with professional development, advocacy and standards development. It also sets the occupational safety, health and environmental community’s standards for excellence and ethics.

ASSE is a global association of occupational safety professionals representing more than 36,000 members worldwide.

Southeastern has a very active ASSE student section, with 100  members.

There are currently more than 400 undergraduate and graduate majors in the Occupational Safety & Health program at Southeastern. The department offers face-to-face and online bachelor and online master’s programs.

The program is a Qualified Academic Program (QAP) and makes graduates eligible to apply for the Graduate Safety Practitioner (GSP) credential. Individuals with the GSP can then apply for the Certified Safety Professional (CSP) credential.

Southeastern ranks seventh nationally in graduating Native American students

DURANT, Okla. – Southeastern Oklahoma State University continues to rank among the nation’s leaders in producing Native American graduates.

According to the latest rankings by Diverse Issues In Higher Education, Southeastern is seventh in the nation for graduating Native American students (baccalaureate) in all disciplines combined.

The University is number one in the Occupational Safety & Health field, and  number two in three other areas – Chemistry; Health, Physical  Education,  and Recreation;  and Communication.

Southeastern also ranks in the top 10 nationally in a number of other disciplines, including Marketing, Liberal and Applied Studies, Accounting, Psychology, Education,  all business-related programs,  and Computer Science and Computer Information Systems.

On the graduate level, Southeastern is top-ranked in Occupational Safety & Health, second in Health, Physical Education,  & Recreation, and 20th in all disciplines combined.

Approximately 30% of Southeastern’s current enrollment is comprised of Native American students.

Listed below are Southeastern’s programs that correspond to the top 10 rankings on the latest Diverse Issues in Higher Education list:

Baccalaureate

1 – Occupational Safety & Health
2 — Chemistry
2 – Health & Physical Education, Recreation
2 — Communication
3 — Marketing
3 — Liberal and Applied Studies
4 — Accounting
4 — Psychology
4 — Education
9 – Business programs – Accounting, Finance, Management, Marketing, General Business
9 — Computer Science and Computer Information Systems

Graduate (Master’s)

1 – Occupational Safety & Health
2 – Sports Studies and Athletic Administration

 

Source: Diverse: Issues In Higher Education analysis of U.S. Department of Education reportssubmitted by institutions.

 

Southeastern student reaches out to help others

By Tyler Roberts

TylerDURANT, Okla. –

(Editor’s Note: Tyler Roberts is a 20-year-old junior at Southeastern Oklahoma State University who is from Valliant, Oklahoma. He is majoring in Occupational Safety & Health, with a minor in Business Management)

I went on a wonderful adventure in early April, visiting a children’s hospital called Shriners down in Shreveport, Louisiana. Deciding to take the Easter holiday to the kids who were unable to enjoy the day like most children, I bought a bunny suit and scheduled a surprise visit for April 6.

The Easter visit was beyond a blessing. You do not realize how lucky you are until you see the less fortunate. When the kids saw me “hopping” to them their eyes lit up and they were smiling ear-to-ear. I had the opportunity to meet with 30 to 40 children that day and each one touched my heart.

Tommie Hazen, the Child Life Department Coordinator at the hospital, asked me if I was too hot in the suit. “No, I am not hot,’’ I replied, “but emotional.”

I did cry that day — not tears of sorrow, but tears of joy. The faces on those kids made my heart melt. I love kids and I especially enjoyed making their day. The ailments they had were upsetting, but to see that they almost jumped out of their chairs just to take a picture with me or to hug me made them forget where they were.

I was asked by several people, “Why would you go to Louisiana to see kids? Why not go somewhere closer?” I answered that with the simplest answer there is — “I would go across this world to make a kid smile.”

There is no destination for kindness. This was no stunt to earn popularity points or get publicity, but a simple, “Hey, it is time to give back. ‘’ And what better way to give back then to give children who cannot enjoy the holiday festivities like most the gift of smiles, gifts, time out of your day, and a few free hugs?

I want to make a difference in this world and I believe that you have to give more than what you receive in order to live a happy life. I challenge everyone who reads

Tyler Roberts visited with children during his recent visit to Louisiana.

Tyler Roberts visited with children during his recent visit to Louisiana.

this to perform an Act of Random Kindness. It does not have to be big — it is the little things that matter. There is no easy way to describe my visit in words. But it was beyond worth the five-hour drive.

I want to offer special thanks to Taylor Williams and Chandler Arterberry (also Southeastern students) for going with me on this trip and helping with the children. And another special thanks to everyone who made a donation (individuals and restaurants).

And by the way, I’m already planning another trip for the fall.

Southeastern ranks 6th nationally in producing Native American graduates

DURANT, Okla. – In what is becoming an annual tradition, Southeastern Oklahoma State University once again ranks among the nation’s leaders in producing Native American graduates.

According to “Diverse Issues In Higher Education,’’ Southeastern ranks sixth in the nation in producing Native American graduates (all disciplines combined) in the Baccalaureate degree category. This is the second year in a row that Southeastern has held this distinction.

Also in the Baccalaureate category and for the fourth consecutive year, Southeastern ranks first in the nation in producing Native American graduates in Engineering Technologies and Engineering — Related Fields (Occupational Safety & Health). The University also ranks number two nationally in graduates in Physical Sciences and Communication, Journalism, and Related Programs (Native American).

In the master’s degree rankings, Southeastern is number one for the fifth consecutive year in Engineering Technologies and Engineering-Related Fields (Occupational Safety & Health – Native American).

“These rankings reflect the innovative programs and services we have in place to support our students through our Native American Center for Student Success,’’ said Southeastern president Sean Burrage. “We recently received a $1.1 million grant from the Department of Education to assist our Native American students as they pursue careers in teacher education. Our students also benefit greatly from the partnerships we have with The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma and the Chickasaw Nation.’’

Each year, “Diverse Issues’’ publishes its top 100 rankings of minority graduates. The report is based on data from the U.S. Department of Education.

Following are Southeastern’s 2014 national rankings, by major, in the Top 100 Degree Producers list (Native American) unless otherwise noted:

Bachelor’s

1 – Engineering Technologies and Engineering-Related Fields (Occupational Safety & Health)

2 – Communication, Journalism, and Related Programs

2 – Physical Sciences

3 – Computer and Information Sciences and Support Services

3 – Education

4 – Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Studies and Humanities

4 – Parks, Recreation, Leisure, and Fitness Studies

5 – Foreign Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics

5 – Homeland Security, Law Enforcement, Firefighting and Related Protective Services (Criminal Justice)

6 – All Disciplines combined

6 – English Language and Literature/Letters

6 – Psychology

8 – Accounting and Related Services

10 – Biological and Biomedical Sciences

10 – Business Management, Marketing, and related support services

11 – Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Studies and Humanities (two or more races)

13 – Visual & Performing Arts

14 – Engineering Technologies and Engineering-related fields (Occupational Safety & Health – two or more races)

16 – Engineering Technologies and Engineering-related fields (Occupational Safety & Health) Total Minority

24 – Social Sciences

30 – Business Administration, Management and Operations

44 – Parks, Recreation, Leisure, and Fitness Studies (two or more races)

Master’s

1 – Engineering Technologies and Engineering-Related Fields (Occupational Safety & Health)

4 – Psychology

16 – All Disciplines combined

17 – Education

20 – Business Administration, Management and Operations

28 – Business Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services

39 – Engineeering Technologies and Engineering-Related Fields (Occupational Safety & Health – total minority)

BrainStorm lecture offers the “odd and unusual’’ from the history of safety

DURANT, Okla. – Chimney sweeps, metals, fire extinguishers, the mine industry, and CPR were among a broad range of topics discussed Tuesday during a presentation on “The Odd and Unusual From the History of Safety.’’

Dr. Halet Poovey holds an old fire extinguisher during the presentation on safety.

Dr. Halet Poovey holds an old fire extinguisher during the presentation on safety.

The 45-minute lecture was part of Southeastern Oklahoma State University’s third annual BrainStorm – a two-week celebration of Research, Scholarship and Creative activities. Lectures on such diverse subjects as science, literature, business, and history, along with musical, dance, and theatrical performances will continue through April 27.

Occupational  Safety & Health professors Halet Poovey and Richard Braley were co-presenters at Tuesday’s program on safety.

Dr. Poovey noted that from the 1600s through about 1850, small children were called upon to clean chimneys due to the narrow width of the chimney

structures. Children were not relieved of this rather dirty, unhealthy duty until the 1850s when safer and more modern methods of cleaning were utilized.

Turning to the subject of metals and health, Poovey said that in the 1930s-40s, police detectives used a mixture of chalk and mercury  in dusting for fingerprints. This combination later resulted in numerous neurological health problems for the detectives, including trembling, vision issues, and even dementia.

In moving the discussion to fire extinguishers, the professors said the early day models contained carbon tetrachloride, which proved to be quite effective but also quite dangerous to its users.  Because of the toxicity of carbon tetrachloride, damaging the nervous system and internal organs, the use of the chemical was discontinued in the 1950s. Several chem

icals followed its use in subsequent years; a carbon dioxide fire extinguisher was invented and also dry chemicals were used in other models.

On the subject of the mine industry and safety, Poovey and Braley observed that in the early days, women and children crawled through the small mine shafts to pull the coal out.  Dr. Braley then displayed various types of safety lamps that were and are utilized.

They also noted that in the past, canaries and waltzing mice were deployed into the mines to determine if the atmosphere was safe.

Dr. Richard Braley offers two examples of coal miners lamps during Tuesday’s BrainStorm lecture.

Dr. Richard Braley offers two examples of coal miners lamps during Tuesday’s BrainStorm lecture.

Carbon monoxide can form underground during a mine fire or after a mine explosion. Today’s coal miners rely on carbon monoxide detectors and monitors to recognize its presence underground. However, before the availability of modern

of distress from the canary was a clear signal that the conditions underground were unsafe, prompting a hasty return to the surface.

For the complete schedule of  BrainStorm events, go to http://homepages.se.edu/brainstorm

Southeastern students receive record number of scholarships from Safety Engineers group

DURANT, Okla. — The Department of Occupational Safety & Health at Southeastern Oklahoma State University has announced a record-setting year of student scholarships from the Foundation of the American Society of Safety Engineers.                The largest Occupational Safety organization in the world with more than 34,000 members, the ASSE Foundation awarded 103 scholarships and grants totaling $194,000, which included 84 scholarships to students representing 37 universities nationwide.

Department Chair Dr. Wayne Jones said, “This is the largest number of scholarships ever awarded at one time to Southeastern’s Occupational Safety Department from the Foundation. This announcement by the ASSE Foundation, combined with our other scholarships awarded this year, brings our total to more than 20 for 2012-2013.  Again, our best year ever.”

Southeastern’s 2013 recipients are:

Edwin P. Locke HSE Scholarship (sponsored by the Texas Safety Foundation)

William Mitchell, Denison, Texas ($2,000)

FabEnCo-LaCook Investment For Excellence in Occupational Safety & Health Scholarship

Walter Smith, McAlester, Oklahoma ($4,000)

ISN Networld Scholarship

Steven Wilson, Calera, Oklahoma ($1,000)

Permian Basin Chapter Endowment

Wesley Johnston, Durant, Oklahoma ($1,000)

Southwest Chapter Roy Kinslow Scholarship

Brenda Lawrence, Calera, Oklahoma ($1,000)

UPS Diversity Scholarship

Brant Plyler, Durant, Oklahoma ($5,250)

Southeastern looks to expand programs to Grayson College’s Van Alstyne campus

Southeastern president Larry Minks and Grayson president Jeremy McMillen sign the new and expanded agreement between the two institutions on Monday afternoon in Van Alstyne.

Southeastern president Larry Minks and Grayson president Jeremy McMillen sign the new and expanded agreement between the two institutions on Monday afternoon in Van Alstyne.

DURANT, Okla. – Thanks to a new agreement signed Monday, Southeastern Oklahoma State University may soon be expanding many of its academic programs to Grayson College in Denison and Van Alstyne, Texas.

In 2005, Southeastern established a higher education teaching center at Grayson’s main campus in Denison.  Through this means, Southeastern has offered  its Elementary Education program, allowing students to earn four-year degrees from Southeastern while attending the classes in Denison. The courses are taught by Southeastern instructors.

Under the terms of the new agreement, Southeastern may expand the program by offering a number of courses of study at Grayson’s south campus (Van Alstyne). Occupational Safety & Health is among the proposed course offerings.

Grayson president Jeremy McMillen and Southeastern president Larry Minks were both present to sign the new agreement, as well as take part in the groundbreaking ceremonies for GC’s South Campus Technical Center.

“This is a great day for the communities along the southern edge of Grayson County,’’ Dr. McMillen said. “With the addition of this new Technical Center and the expanded partnership with Southeastern, citizens now have immediate access to a comprehensive community college as well as a university, right here in Van Alstyne.”

“We are excited about this expanding collaboration between Southeastern and Grayson,’’ said Dr. Minks. “It’s a win-win situation for the institutions, but more importantly, for the students. Dr. McMillen and his staff at Grayson are tremendous partners and we look forward to a bright future working together.’’

The new agreement is pending final approval from the higher education governing boards in Oklahoma and the Higher Learning Commission.

(cutline) Southeastern president Larry Minks and Grayson president Jeremy McMillen sign the new and expanded agreement between the two institutions on Monday afternoon in Van Alstyne.