Southeastern News

Southeastern’s Speech and Debate team competes in OU event

DURANT, Okla. – The Southeastern Speech and Debate Association’s impressive streak of speech/debate competitors reaching the finals came to an end recently at the University of Oklahoma’s Sweetheart Swing Speech and Debate Tournament in Norman.

The forensics tournament featured an open National Parliamentary Debate and InternationalPublic Debate Association tournament as well as two self-contained American Forensics Association National Individual Events tournament.

Connor Judd and Jacob Morrison of Southeastern Oklahoma State University reached the quarterfinals in the open Parliamentary Debate competition. Judd and Morrison ran their combined season’s record to 24-5 in both novice and open Parli competition rounds.

SSDA will next compete at the Oklahoma Intercollegiate Forensics Association’s State Tournament in Oklahoma City in March.

To learn more about Southeastern’s intercollegiate forensics program and SSDA’s tournament schedule visit the Department of Art, Communication and Theatre website at http://homepages.se.edu/comm or contact Speech and Debate Advisor Dr. Randy Clark at ext. 2556.

Benefactor, Heritage Awards to honor Brigance, Crockett during Homecoming

Albert H. Brigance

DURANT, Okla. – Southeastern Oklahoma State University’s Alumni Association will present the Benefactor and Heritage Awards as part of Homecoming 2012.

Both awards will be presented at the Distinguished Awards banquet at 5:30 p.m. Friday, September 28, in the Visual and Performing Arts Center.

The Benefactor Award will be presented posthumously to Albert H. Brigance. This award is presented to individuals, businesses or foundations that support the University through financial means. Albert’s wife, Pat, will accept the award.

In addition, the grand opening of the Albert H. Brigance Curriculum and Assessment Center is scheduled for 2-4 p.m. Thursday, September 27, in Southeastern Oklahoma State University’s Henry G. Bennett Memorial Library.

The Curriculum and Assessment Center was made possible by a generous gift from the Brigance family. The substantial donation included a contribution to the already established Albert H. Brigance scholarship and should allow awards to two individuals during their junior years and follow them through graduation.

The gift creates the Curriculum and Assessment Center and supplies the Center with faculty-selected educational materials.

The donation also includes funding for the Albert H. Brigance Endowed Lectureship and the Brigance Endowment Fund to supply and maintain current materials, children’s books and videos for future use.

Brigance, who was named a Distinguished Alumnus in 1999 at Southeastern, was born near Keota, Oklahoma. He earned his Bachelor’s degree as an honor student at Southeastern in 1955 while serving in the United States Air Force.

He met Pat Hicks at Southeastern and they were married in Durant in 1956. Their daughters, Rebecca and Royce, were born in Fresno, California.

Brigance was nationally recognized as an early childhood education resource specialist. He created the first comprehensive criterion-referenced Inventory of Basic Skills, which became the most widely used instrument for assessment evaluation, student academic placement, individual education plans (IEPs) and instructional planning.

He authored more than 40 books, which have been used nationwide as well as some of them being used internationally. As an author, he was associated with Curriculum Associates in Massachusetts and Phoenix Learning Systems in Pennsylvania.

He also developed early childhood screening instruments, other inventories for individuals from birth through secondary levels of education and a reading program for older at-risk students and adults with low reading skills.

Dr. Bernice Crockett

The Heritage Award, which honors individuals who have impacted the history of Southeastern in some unique way, will be presented posthumously to Dr. Bernice Crockett. Daughter Chloe Crockett Baulch will accept the award.

Dr. Bernice Crockett was born in Pauls Valley, Oklahoma, in 1908. She graduated from Baylor University with her Registered Nurse credentials in 1928 and did her assigned practical nursing in Durant, where she met and married James Henry Crockett Jr. in 1929.

She worked for the Public Health Department while earning her Bachelor’s Degree in Art and English from Southeastern in 1934. She completed her Master’s in Education at the University of Oklahoma in 1949, a Master’s in Health Education at OU in 1951, and received her Doctorate in Education from OU in 1953. Crockett also did graduate work at Peabody College for Teachers in Nashville, Tennessee.

During the time she was earning her advanced degrees, she was listed in the Southeastern State College yearbook as RN and School Nurse. Later, Crockett was promoted to Professor of Health Education and then Director of Health Education.

In the early 1950s, she organized the first pre-school clinics for the Durant Public Schools. Beginning in the early ’60s, she served as Curriculum Coordinator of the Dental Health Workshops for Teachers of Oklahoma.

In 1968, she started the first Day Care Center for SSC students’ children. She was a long-time sponsor of the Little D Rodeo Club, an activity she dearly loved.

Crockett retired from Southeastern in 1971, moved to Oklahoma City and accepted a position with the Kerr Foundation and Oklahoma Water, Inc.

Governor David Walters appointed Crockett to The Oklahoma Historical Society Board in the 1980s and she served until her death in 1995.

Crockett authored numerous articles, including “The Origin and Development of Public Health in Oklahoma; 1830-1930,” used for her Ed.D thesis; and “Health Conditions in Indian Territory 1830 to the Civil War.” A frequent contributor to “The Chronicles of Oklahoma,” her articles may be found today at the Oklahoma Historical Society.

Crockett and her husband, Henry, who served as principal of Robert E. Lee Elementary School in Durant, had two daughters, Lynn Crockett Clarke and Chloe Crockett Baulch. Lynn graduated from Oklahoma State University in 1957 and Chloe graduated from SSC in 1969. Chloe married Trent Baulch, also a 1969 Southeastern graduate.

Lynn and Chloe agree that they were blessed with two extraordinary parents. Chloe said, “Heartfelt thanks to president Larry Minks and the Alumni Association for honoring our mother with the 2012 Heritage Award. Also, a special thank you to retired professor Arnold Walker for his time and research on mom’s behalf.

“We would also like to remember former Southeastern State College presidents Dr. T.T. Montgomery, Dr. A.E. Shearer, and Dr. Leon Hibbs.”

Southeastern students participate in science workshop at OU

Southeastern students participate in science workshop at

Press Release Date: 9-9-2011

Patricia Pace, Sushma Ale, and Judith Zounon, are pictured in the OU lab with Dr. Bradley Stevenson.

Patricia Pace, Sushma Ale, and Judith Zounon, are pictured in the OU lab with Dr. Bradley Stevenson.

DURANT, Okla. – Three Southeastern Oklahoma State University students participated in the new undergraduate workshop on Environmental Microbiology and Biotechnology held recently at the University of Oklahoma.

Judith Zounon, a senior biotechnology major from Benin (Africa), Patricia Pace, senior biology major from Howe, Texas, and Sushma Ale, from Nepal, and a 2011 Southeastern biology graduate and current Master’s of Technology student, attended the workshop organized by Dr. Bradley Stevenson, OU assistant professor in the Department of Botany and Microbiology.

In addition to learning scientific techniques and facts, the participants were exposed to what it is like to be graduate students, which helped them in considering the pursuit of a Ph.D. or master’s degree.

Despite the extreme summer heat, the students visited outdoor sampling sites, including the Norman landfill, to collect microbe-filled samples for laboratory analysis.

Zounon, Pace and Ale grew and tested bacteria using OU lab resources, and listened to guest lecturers from OU, Oklahoma State University, and the Noble Foundation speak about their research projects.

The students also prepared their results for presentations and reports and recorded their impressions on the course blog on-line.

The Southeastern students lived near the OU campus and took field trips to such locations as the Sam Noble Museum of Natural History and the Kessler Farm Field Laboratory.

All three students said they were extremely grateful for the opportunity and learned much from the experience.

Stevenson said, “I couldn’t have asked for a better group of students. Everyone worked really hard, but was eager to learn.”

One of the main research topics was the isolation and characterization of novel microorganisms from the Norman Landfill Research Site, managed by the United States Geological Survey. The students focused on microorganisms that degrade the many compounds found in groundwater contaminated by the landfill.

Students’ housing, food, laboratory fees, plus a small cash stipend, were provided by Oklahoma’s National Science Foundation EPSCoR Educational Outreach program and the University of Oklahoma.

“Students from all of the regional universities in Oklahoma were invited to apply for the program,” said Dr. Nancy Paiva, Southeastern contact for the outreach program.

“Southeastern was fortunate to have three applicants accepted,” she added. “For this first trial year, funds limited the number of participants to 10. This is exactly what some of our science majors need to help them decide if a graduate research career is right for them.”